Fox Byte 5775 #17: Yitro (Jethro)

יִתְרוֹ

In a tremendous breach of protocol, Queen Esther (Tiffany Dupont) approaches the throne of King Xerxes (Lou Goss).  From the 2006 film One Night with the King (photo:  Box Office Mojo).
The climactic scene of One Night with the King.  In a tremendous breach of protocol, Queen Esther (Tiffany Dupont) approaches the throne of King Xerxes (Lou Goss).  (Photo: Box Office Mojo).

Just because a person enjoys the favor of the king does not mean they can do as they please.  This is not some antiquated concept that no longer applies to modern days.  A king may have the power to take a life, but a president, a general, an employer, or even a parent has the power to revoke privileges, inflict punishment, cut off access, and otherwise make life miserable for someone who gets on their bad side.  Whether the setting is before a throne, in an office, or around a kitchen table, those who disregard the authority figure’s protocol will suffer the consequences.

A timeless example of this principle is in the ancient story of Esther, the Jewish exile who became queen of the mighty Xerxes I (Ahasuerus) of Persia.  When advised of a plot by the king’s Grand Vizier, Haman, to annihilate her people, Esther takes it upon herself to intervene.  Protocol dictates that she cannot come into the king’s presence unless he summons her, yet the situation is urgent and Esther has little choice but to enter the throne room unbidden.  She does so, willing to trade her own life for the lives of the Jewish nation.  Her trust is ultimately in her God, but she goes also in the knowledge that she has the favor of King Xerxes and knows him intimately.  He should understand that she would not break protocol unless she had very good reason.  Perhaps the most stunning portrayal of this story is in the 2006 movie, One Night with the King, starring Tiffany Dupont as Esther and Lou Goss as Xerxes.  In the great climactic scene in the throne room, Esther humbly yet purposefully approaches the king, undeterred by the calls for her death.  She stands at last in front of the throne, raising pleading eyes to the king, and awaits his decision to take her head in payment for her breach of protocol, or extend to her his scepter as a token of forgiveness and continued favor.

We know the rest of the story:  the king extends his scepter and grants Esther’s petition to attend a series of banquets at which she calls on him for salvation from Haman’s wicked plot.  By the king’s command, Haman receives his just reward and Esther and her uncle Mordecai proceed with actions in the king’s name to preempt the genocide.  What we do not often realize, and what Esther and Xerxes themselves probably did not know, is that they were acting on principles that God Himself had established from the beginning, and which He had communicated to His people at Mount Sinai.

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Why Amalek Matters

"The Victory of Joshua over the Amalekites" Nicolas Poussin
“The Victory of Joshua over the Amalekites”
Nicolas Poussin

A Jewish friend once told me that in some Jewish circles the way to celebrate Purim is to drink so much at the party that it becomes difficult to distinguish Esther from Haman.  I have not been to such a Purim party, but I do understand (thanks to certain indiscretions in my misspent youth) what it means to forget what happened at a party.  It seems to me that God wanted His people to observe the events of Purim, but probably not in that particular way.

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Assorted Antichrists

BFB140217 Types of AntichristIt is a peculiar thing that the book of Esther does not mention God, particularly since the hand of God is evident throughout the story.  In brief, the story is that Haman, the Grand Vizier of Persia in the reign of King Xerxes, became consumed with hatred at the Jews because Esther’s kinsman Mordechai refused to bow down to him.  Haman determined to gain revenge not only against Mordechai, but against all the Jews.  His plan was to manipulate the king into issuing a decree that on the thirteenth day of the month of Adar all the enemies of the Jews throughout the Persian Empire could rise up and kill them.  God’s plan of salvation was already in motion for He had brought Esther in to the palace as Xerxes’ new queen.  He worked through Esther to reveal Haman’s plot to the king.  At the king’s order, Haman and his sons were executed, and Mordechai and Esther had authority to issue another decree in the king’s name for the Jews to rise up against their enemies on the very day that they were to have been slaughtered.  Since that time, Jews have celebrated the feast of Purim every year on the fourteenth day of Adar. Please click here to continue reading