Documenting Redemption: A Review of Ten From the Nations: Torah Awakening Among Non-Jews, by Rivkah Lambert Adler

The history of humanity is filled with mothers in all eras and all cultures saying to their children the equivalent of, “I don’t care if you don’t like how that tastes. Eat it; it’s good for you.” In my case, it was broccoli, but I can imagine children around the world sitting glumly in front of their food as their mothers tell them they won’t grow up big and strong unless they finish their borscht, ceviche, pho, or ugali. God created mothers to be right about such things, which is why each generation survives and (depending on the degree to which they listen to Mom) thrives.

This principle works just as well regarding nourishment for the mind, soul, and spirit as for the body. That is why those who persevere in reading and studying even when the subject matter is uncomfortable tend to come out much better in the end – smarter, wiser, more tolerant, and better able to cooperate with others in the interest of a greater good. Rivkah Lambert Adler has provided rich nourishment of this sort in her book, Ten From the Nations: Torah Awakening Among Non-Jews.

The groundbreaking aspect of Ten From the Nations is that Adler is among the first (perhaps the first) Jewish scholars to document the global phenomenon of Christians coming to an appreciation of Torah. She describes the phenomenon this way:

All over the world, current and former Christians are becoming aware of Torah. They are learning about, and implementing, what most of the world thinks of as Jewish practices, including celebrating Shabbat [Sabbath] and the Biblical holidays. They are refraining from eating pork and shellfish. They are studying Torah and seeing the Land of Israel, and especially the return of the Jewish people to the Land of Israel, in a new light. They are building positive relationships with the Jewish people.

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Much Ado About Christmas

Here’s what we presented on Hebrew Nation Radio on Monday, December 18:

What are we supposed to think about Christmas? On one hand, it is not one of Feasts of the Lord which He established as an appointed time for His people to celebrate. But then, it is the time when Christians all over the world celebrate the coming of Messiah Yeshua. It matters little to the vast majority of Christians that Yeshua (Jesus) was not born in December, nor that non-biblical (even pagan?) elements have become integral parts of the season’s traditions. In fact, Christmas has become something of a litmus test for those who claim to follow Yeshua (Jesus).

This is the subject we tackle in what may be our most controversial program to date on The Remnant Road. The key question is this: does our shared testimony of faith in Yeshua make it possible to find common ground with traditional Christians even though we have profound differences in our understanding of the scriptures? As we discuss that topic, we cover other important ground, such as how our newfound esteem for the Torah our Messiah taught impacts relationships with family, friends, and others who see things differently. Is there a way we can find common ground? Is there even a way to find peace in this season that has become the most difficult time of the year for us? What does this mean in God’s eternal plan?

Come with us on this stretch of The Remnant Road. You might find something helpful along the way. To listen to the podcast, click on this link:

https://hebrewnationonline.com/hebrew-nation-morning-show-the-remnant-road-12-18-17/

The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn, Mike Clayton, Barry Phillips, and Hanoch Young is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.

© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Sukkotin’

Here’s what’s coming on Hebrew Nation Radio on Monday, October 9:
What are you doing for Sukkot – the Feast of Tabernacles? The Jewish people have celebrated Sukkot for over three thousand years – finding creative and meaningful ways to mark this special appointment with the Creator. The Torah Awakening among non-Jews has now added a number of new traditions from Ephraimites and others around the world who have begun to take seriously the commandment to mark this time with great joy:
You shall observe the Feast of Tabernacles seven days, when you have gathered from your threshing floor and from your winepress. And you shall rejoice in your feast, you and your son and your daughter, your male servant and your female servant and the Levite, the stranger and the fatherless and the widow, who are within your gates. Seven days you shall keep a sacred feast to the Lord your God in the place which the Lord chooses, because the Lord your God will bless you in all your produce and in all the work of your hands, so that you surely rejoice. (Deuteronomy 16:13-15)
In this show, Mike and Al guide us through a tour of Sukkot at two different locations in the Southeastern USA. You may be surprised at who turns up as our guests!

Remnant Road 02The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn, Mike Clayton, Barry Phillips, and Hanoch Young is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.

© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Ten From the Nations

Here’s what’s coming on Hebrew Nation Radio on Monday, October 2:

One of the end-times prophecies that is getting more attention these days is from Zechariah:

Thus says the Lord of hosts, “In those days ten men from all the nations will grasp the garment of a Jew, saying, ‘Let us go with you, for we have heard that God is with you.'” (Zechariah 8:23)

What exactly does this mean? Are all these people from the nations going to become Jewish? Or does it have something to do with the Torah Awakening among non-Jews? Why are all these people from the nations coming to an appreciation of the Torah, and is there some connection to the final redemption?

Pondering these questions motivated Rivkah Lambert Adler to compile a book about it. The book is called, appropriately, Ten from the Nations: Torah Awakening Among Non-Jews. In it she presents testimonies from over 40 contributors, most of whom are non-Jews who have begun to observe the Torah. Rivkah’s book is one of the first attempts to investigate this awakening – not so much to explain it, but to document the breadth and depth of what is happening worldwide. She joins us in the second hour of the show to tell us what she has learned.

To find out more about Ten From the Nations, visit Rivkah’s web site:

http://www.tenfromthenations.com/

Ten From the Nations will be published in October 2017. Sign up from email updates to learn about when and where it will be available!

The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn, Mike Clayton, Barry Phillips, and Hanoch Young is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.

© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

What does Hebraic revival look like?

Here’s what’s coming on Hebrew Nation Radio on Monday, August 28:
 The history of Christianity features periods of major revival, particularly in the last 500 years. One explanation of this is that revivals happen at times when God is restoring something His people have lost. The Reformation, for example, featured restoration of the Word of God as the Bible was translated into the common languages of Europe. The Great Awakenings of the 18th and 19th centuries emphasized repentance and holiness, transforming societies through such actions as the abolition of slavery and giving birth to the modern missionary movement. Then came the Azusa Street and similar revivals in the early 20th century, with their emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit, followed by the message of evangelism in Billy Graham’s generation. In the last 40 years, intercessory prayer has developed into a global movement that has united Christians of many denominations around the world in a concerted effort to seek the heart of the Father.

So what happens when the next move of God is not associated with the traditional church?

That seems to be the case with the Torah Awakening. Multitudes of Christians are now beginning to understand not only the applicability of Torah to their lives, but also their identity as Hebrews. What are the implications of this awakening? And what will be the result when the focus of previous revivals – particularly the Holy Spirit, holiness, and intercessory prayer – combine with a desire to learn Yah’s ways and follow them in obedience?

Join us for what may be our most important discussion yet as Mike, Barry, Al, and Hanoch share their observations and expectations. You won’t want to miss this one!

The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn, Mike Clayton, Barry Phillips, and Hanoch Young is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.

© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.