Tag Archive | South Carolina

Ordinary Legends: A Review of T.S. 44 – The Button Tree Prophet, by William Spires

One of those unfortunate traits of any generation is the tendency to ignore our elders. Those who take time to talk with and listen to parents, grandparents, and other older people often come away with unexpected blessings. After all, they have lived through experiences that everyone must encounter at some point, and thus have acquired valuable lessons to share with younger people who have yet to go through those experiences. Of course, that is what we expect. What surprises us is that the ordinary life experience of our elders frequently turns out to be the stuff of legends. Will Spires discovered this in conversation with his father. What he learned about his father’s childhood in Columbia, South Carolina, during World War II inspired him to build a coming-of-age story that resonates with readers on many levels.

Spires’ first novel, T.S. 44: The Button Tree Prophet, investigates the world of an ordinary boy from a working-class family. But then, what is ordinary about a boy losing his father on the eve of his tenth birthday? Perhaps that is what makes this novel so compelling from the first page. Travis Shipley’s life is already what contemporary readers would describe as underprivileged. His family is poor, his parents are uneducated, the Great Depression has drained his country of much of its vitality, and global war is redefining every facet of human interaction. In a world where everything that once was normal is now in transition, the merciless scythe of cancer snatches away the greatest source of stability in his young life. All that he has to help him find the right direction is a button his father gives him just before his death, charging him with the task of finding out what it means to be a button.

How Travis adjusts to this new reality is the vehicle by which Spires conducts us on a captivating journey through the convulsions impacting the urban, industrial, segregated American South of the mid-twentieth century. The fact that this Southern society is decidedly Christian – at least culturally – explains why this is a story of faith. Few stories of the South in that era could be otherwise. Christianity defines the culture for all the characters, regardless of their color, economic status, education, or even religion. That is where we find the first unique point of Spires’ novel. As Travis moves through the fog of grief and the daily reality of grinding poverty, he encounters help from unexpected sources. Chief among them is Jacob Meadows, a disabled World War I veteran who serves as the local truant officer. We quickly learn that Meadows, an observant Jew, is somehow able to move comfortably between the Jewish and Christian communities. This is surprising on several counts. First, the average reader likely is not aware that the Jewish community of South Carolina has ancient roots, going back to the earliest colonial days. Spires provides the historical background, establishing credible reason for Meadows to be simultaneously Jewish and Southern. That helps explain the next unusual point: how Jews interact with Christians in the American South. It is actually not so unusual. As a minority in every place where they have lived through the ages, Jews have learned to interact with the larger community, and simultaneously find space to be Jewish. Jacob Meadows helps us understand how that worked out in South Carolina. But then there is the strangest point of all: how this Jewish man can interact with Christians on their own terms. Spires provides not only a plausible explanation, but a very strong one. The answer comes from Meadows’ experience on the battlefields of France in the First World War, where differences of belief and practice fade in the presence of a brotherhood born of sacrificial love extending beyond the grave.

That is what makes Jacob Meadows the perfect mentor for young Travis. As unlikely as it may seem, it is he who is best equipped to help the lad through the inevitable questioning of and anger at God for the hard trials he endures. Meadows comes in at precisely the right moment, helping not only Travis, but his mother. Sarah Shipley is a woman already worn down by the ordeal of caring for her dying husband. Her new role as single parent of a precocious and willful son is all the more difficult because of her long hours at work earning just enough to pay the bills. The Shipley family needs stability and normalcy, which Meadows is willing and able to provide it in good measure. Others assist him, although not always by design. One is Alfred Patterson, a hard-nosed journalist who learns of Travis’ story, and another is Annie Wright, Travis’ classmate and neighbor, who is dealing with her own father issues. Then there is the Ragman, a black shoeshine artist whose long career as a railroad porter and as a pastor give him just the right words to speak into Travis’ life at the moment he needs them.

The encounter with the Ragman stands as one of the most poignant episodes of T.S. 44. This is where Spires deals with one of the ugliest features of the American South: segregation. Spires does not hit it head on. In fact, he does not hit any issue head on. Many aspects of life in that era are uncomfortable and even reprehensible by contemporary standards. The secondary status of African-Americans is but one. So also are the divisions between rich and poor, educated and uneducated, the powerful and the weak, men and women, and Christian and Jew. Moreover, the ubiquitous presence of cigarettes is something contemporary readers will find uncomfortable and even disgusting. Yet all these are part of the reality of mid-twentieth century America. Spires incorporates all of that reality into his story without judgment. That is one of the strengths of his work; had he engaged in judgement, his novel would be nothing more than a shrill cry for social justice that would bypass the deeper human truths he conveys. Thus we see the poignancy of the Ragman’s meeting with Travis: an old black man and a young white boy connecting on very human terms, even in defiance of the color barrier and other realities that otherwise would keep them apart.

In time, Travis finds an answer to the question of what it means to be a button. The Ragman is one of those who help him find that answer. Along the way, Travis not only receives help from unexpected sources, but finds himself helping others in unexpected ways. In the end, a tragedy that should never befall one so young imparts a life lesson that few learn even in old age: every one of us impacts multitudes of others in ways we usually do not realize. What Travis Shipley learns is that it is better to make that impact a good one by easing the burdens of others whenever possible. This opens him to what may only be described as a miraculous encounter with his Creator. Is that miracle believable? By the time Travis is ready to walk it out, the question is turned on its head. He has already come through improbable circumstances just by making himself available for God to use as He pleases. In a sense, his very survival to the age of ten is miraculous. Why, then, should he question Divine intervention at all? If it comes in small things like responding with compassion to the presence of a mouse in his room, then surely it is there in moments of great need. And that is how Travis Shipley, the unlikely Button Tree Prophet of Columbia, South Carolina, teaches us what it means to be human.

T.S. 44: The Button Tree Prophet is available at Key of David Publishing (https://www.keyofdavidpublishing.com/).


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2018.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
Advertisements

Israel 2016: Finding Shabbat in Gi’vat Ye’arim

 

bfb161015-shabbat-tableShabbat (Sabbath) in a Jewish community in Israel is different from Shabbat at home in America.  What we have experienced in Israel may be similar to what one would encounter in an American Jewish community, but it is new to us.  We non-Jewish Sabbath keepers, even those of us who have been keeping Shabbat for many years, are still finding our way.  What we know is that Messiah Yeshua kept it, that He taught His disciples to continue obeying the commandments, and that we want to do as He did because we love Him so much.

Our Christian traditions have forbidden us from keeping Shabbat ever since the days of Emperor Constantine, and many of the Jewish traditions seem to make Shabbat incomprehensibly complicated.  Even so, we know that Shabbat is a bubble in time which occurs once in seven days.  When we enter that bubble, we come into a place where YHVH is waiting.  America continues at its frenetic pace around us, with its Saturday football games, festivals, work opportunities, soccer matches, and all the myriad other things we deemed important for much of our lives.  For us that world drifts into the shadows as we turn our attention inward toward home, family, gathering with friends, and meeting with the holy, loving, and kind God Who has invited us to be still and know that He is indeed God.

This is not to say that our Shabbat observance is perfect.  We live in a world where Shabbat is not even a word most people recognize, nor a concept they understand.  We juggle our schedules as best we can to avoid any normal business, work, travel, or other things which keep us from this divine appointment.  That in itself strains relationships with family and friends who do not esteem the day as we do.  Then there are the constant temptations to bend the rules:  to finish that one last bit of work just after the sun sets, or to check up on the scores when our favorite teams are playing, or to compromise by meeting our non-Shabbat-keeping family at a restaurant early on Saturday evening.  We do our best not to be legalistic, but to manage these competing requirements of life in Babylon while obeying our King.

This is where we begin to identify with our Jewish brethren.  They have been living this balancing act for millennia, and it is logical that we look to them for inspiration.  Thus we have come to Gi’vat Ye’arim, not even knowing that we have come here for reasons the Almighty had determined before we even heard of the place.

Please click here to continue reading

After the Fox: Still in Transition

Two months ago the world received notice that The Barking Fox is on the move.  The relocation to North Carolina is complete, but our transition is still in progress.  We set up housekeeping in Charlotte on September 4, and thanks to tremendous help from Pete Rambo and his family, we finished unpacking and had most of the place in order within a week.  We had to get settled in a hurry so we could go to Virginia and see our oldest daughter married at the end of the month – just in time to prepare for the High Holy Days!

Even now the Fall Feasts are upon us.  The sun is setting in Charlotte, which means the new Hebrew year 5777 is here.  This weekend we enjoyed Shabbat with the Rambo family at their home in South Carolina, and with them entered into the season of Yom Teruah (the Feast of Trumpets, celebrated by our Jewish brethren as Rosh Hashanah).  While there we joined with Tommy and Dorothy Wilson, fellow leaders of B’ney Yosef North America, in prayerfully planning our upcoming trip to Israel for Sukkot (the Feast of Tabernacles) and the Second B’ney Yosef National Congress

Our expectations are very high that this season will bring the climax to many of the prophetic events connected with Messiah’s return.  Whether we will see Him coming this year is something no one can say for certain, but as we watch the signs of the times we can’t help but conclude that the current world order, which has been in place for 100 years, is rapidly giving way to something new.  Although we cannot know exactly what we will encounter in Israel, we anticipate that as Ephraimite delegates from around the globe gather for the Congress, YHVH will provide direction for this coming year.  Those of us who have blogs and other media outlets will be covering the events as best we can, so look for some exciting reports!

And after that?  We will continue learning who we are as Hebrews awakening to our identity as part of the covenant people of YHVH.  Our transition from Texas to North Carolina is part of that.  In my book, Give Me A Place Where I May Dwell, I share thoughts about what it will take for us to develop this sense of being a people – Hebrews and Israelites of the House of Joseph/Ephraim who are preparing to be reunited with our brethren of Judah (the Jewish people) at the coming of Messiah Son of David.  Here are some of those thoughts:

There are already many gatherings of like-minded believers at Sukkot in various places.  This is a very good start, but it is time to consider how to transform these virtual communities into actual communities.  That means many of us will have to relocate so that we can live near fellow Ephraimites.  Initially this relocation and community building should happen in the lands we now call home.  We should look for places where we can congregate as neighbors and learn to live together as a distinct people.  Perhaps this means establishing new villages and towns in rural areas, or perhaps moving into neighborhoods in cities and suburbs where housing is available.  When we look we will find many possibilities.  The important thing is to look, to make a concerted effort to find one another, associate with one another, live next to one another, and together create the meaning of the Ephraimite people. 

That is the purpose of our transition.  Already we count ourselves part of a vibrant and growing Hebrew community in Western Carolina (the western counties of North and South Carolina).  We were much blessed to be connected with similar communities in Texas and hope to remain connected with them.  However, if we have heard YHVH correctly, our place at this particular time is in the Southeastern United States, and here we look forward to making a real contribution to the developing regional network of Hebrew communities.

This brings us to the fun part of this post.  Our move from Texas to North Carolina was perhaps the easiest relocation we have ever had thanks to our God’s provision.  The pictures below illustrate this transition through the eyes of our dog, Blue.  This was a strange experience for her, but she seems to have come through it quite well and adjusted quickly to her new home.

L’shana tova from all of us to all of you!


This is perplexing. What was familiar is now oddly different.

This is perplexing. What was familiar is now oddly different.


I don’t understand. These people show up with a big truck and now I’m in jail.

I don’t understand. These people show up with a big truck and now I’m in jail.

Please click here to continue reading

Our Baby is Alive and Well! A Report on the Growth of B’ney Yosef North America

Great celebration attended the birth of B'ney Yosef North America on March 6, 2016.

Great celebration attended the birth of B’ney Yosef North America on March 6, 2016.

Parents know very well that the excitement of a child’s birth fades very quickly as reality of life with a newborn infant sets in.  After the ordeal of labor and delivery, the rapid passage of news by phone calls and Facebook posts, and the welcome of a seemingly endless stream of family and friends, a rather dull routine sets in.  Much to the frustration of older siblings, the baby does very little except sleep, eat, cry, and . . . well, you know.  It will be quite some time before the child gains controls of its limbs, and still more time before it can sit up on its own and even begin to think about crawling.  Only after that can the child progress toward walking, talking, feeding itself, and learning how to be polite in public.

A newborn organization goes through these same growth stages.  Whether it is a company, a ministry, or a nation, the newborn still requires time and nurture before it can stand on its own.

Such is the case with our newborn, B’ney Yosef North America.  BYNA is barely one month old, and although there is not much visible to the public, this child is healthy and growing just as it should.

Please click here to continue reading

Celebrating Shabbat Texas Style!

B'ney Yosef National Shabbat New

Fischer Park in New Braunfels, TX, site of the first Central Texas National Shabbat.

Fischer Park in New Braunfels, TX, site of the first Central Texas National Shabbat.

The National Shabbat movement arrived in the Lone Star State through a gathering of about 100 people on March 19 at Fischer Park in the city of New Braunfels.  As with National Shabbats in Georgia and South Carolina, some participants traveled many hours to get there, coming from as far away as Sabine Pass on the Louisiana border, Wichita Falls near the Oklahoma border, Arlington in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area, and Corpus Christi on the Gulf Coast.  Most of those assembled in New Braunfels came from around Austin (Georgetown, Cedar Park, Round Rock, Kyle) and San Antonio (Boerne, Converse, Poteet, Adkins, Floresville), with a significant number from the Houston area (Katy, Sugarland, Pasadena). Please click here to continue reading

B’ney Yosef National Shabbat Has Come to Central Texas!

B'ney Yosef National Shabbat NewWhat is it that brings God’s people together faster than anything else?  How about praising and worshipping our Creator together on the day He set aside for that purpose?  That is the purpose of the B’ney Yosef National Shabbat:

“Once a month, there will be a Shabbat [Sabbath] experience that will bring Northern Israelites together from fellowships, congregations, and homes to express and declare to Avinu (our Father) that we are the people of Northern Israel.  There will be no teaching, but occasional presentations about our national restoration and Scriptural discussions promoting a national outlook.”  – B’ney Yosef National Shabbat Vision Statement

The National Shabbat first appeared in Georgia, and then South Carolina, and now it’s coming to Central Texas on March 19, 2016.  Here are the details:


TexasCENTRAL TEXAS NATIONAL SHABBAT

  • When: Saturday, March 19 from 12:00 PM to 7:00 PM
  • Where: Fischer Park, 1820 McQueeney Road, New Braunfels, TX 78130, off I-35 between San Antonio and Austin. For map and directions click here.  
  • To download a .PDF of Fischer Park click here:  Fischer Park Map
  • For planning purposes, we would appreciate if you visit this link and RSVP:

http://www.evite.com/event/0365QHHKN63W5AFUGEPF3Q27Z5EN3Q?gid=034AHN2IISIN6E4W2EPF35LHV35GXA

  • Gather with us as we celebrate Shabbat as the Nation of B’ney Yosef (Children of Joseph) of the House of Israel. Those who choose to arrive at 12 noon will begin our time of fellowship eating lunch together. 
  • We will hear opening greetings and Scriptures, and then take time to praise and worship Yeshua our King!
  • Ephraim and Rimona Frank from Israel will be sharing, along with Sister Kaye, who lived in Aqaba, Jordan, for 25 years. We will hear the report from the B’ney Yosef North America Summit in Tampa, Florida, and be given a glimpse of expectations for the Second B’ney Yosef National Congress to be held in Ariel, Israel this October.
  • We look for the possibility of folks from across Texas and even neighboring states to join us. You won’t want to miss meeting fellow Hebrews of B’ney Yosef!!
  • There is no charge for this gathering, but we will have an offering box available for those who would like to help with the costs of the National Shabbat.
  • Please bring sufficient food for your family for the evening meal also, as well as any snacks and drinks that you and your family may require. PLEASE BRING FOOD FOR YOUR OWN FAMILY ONLY!!  Due to park regulations we are not able to have shared food at this gathering.  ALSO, PLEASE BRING LAWN CHAIRS.
  • All children and teens will be expected to have PARENTAL supervision AT ALL TIMES, please!!
  • We mention here this park rule: GLASS beverage containers are prohibited at the park.
  • To make sure everyone has the best possible National Shabbat experience, please click here to review additional park rules:  Central Texas National Shabbat – Fischer Park Rules

BFB160308 Fischer Park - New Braunfels


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2015-2016.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

When a Nation is Born in a Day

logo long in blue box NAMany dry bones lie scattered across Tennessee.  Tens of thousands of them found their resting places during the tumultuous years of the American Civil War.  Perhaps it is fitting, therefore, that Tennessee served as the place where the dry bones of the House of Yosef (Joseph) began to come back to life in North America.

This is a prophesied event, of course.  More accurately, it is a prophesied process – the single greatest topic of prophecy in the entire Bible.  Israel, the nation Almighty God established in covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, split into two pieces and died many hundreds of years ago.  Judah, the part of that nation which we know now as the Jewish people, retained knowledge of its identity, and in 1948 returned to life as the State of Israel.  The other part of the nation, however, has never come back to life. 

Until now.

Please click here to continue reading

B’ney Yosef Awakening in North Texas

HN News

A Hebrew Nation News Special Report by Al McCarn

B’ney Yosef Region 35 Conference, which took place on December 4-6, 2015 with 100 attendees gathered in Denton, Texas.

B’ney Yosef Region 35 Conference, which took place on December 4-6, 2015 with 100 attendees gathered in Denton, Texas.

Are we living in the time of the end that humanity has anticipated for millennia?  It seems so, at least according to the wars and rumors of war and all the other signs students of prophecy have expected.  Yet it is also the time of the beginning.  In Messiah Yeshua’s discourse recorded in Matthew 24 and Mark 13 He spoke of these things as birth pangs.  What is being born?  Isaiah helps us understand:

Who has heard such a thing?  Who has seen such things?  Can a land be born in one day?  Can a nation be brought forth all at once?  As soon as Zion travailed, she also brought forth her sons.  “Shall I bring to the point of birth and not give delivery?” says the Lord.  “Or shall I who gives delivery shut the womb?” says your God.  (Isaiah 66:8-9 NASB)

Isaiah and Yeshua speak of the birth, or rebirth, of the nation of Israel, YHVH’s chosen people through whom He will work redemption for all nations.  Part of that nation has already come into being:  the Jewish part known as the State of Israel, which is the restored House of Judah.  What the world is awaiting now is the restoration of the rest of the nation:  the non-Jewish tribes of the House of Joseph, also called the House of Ephraim, who have had no national existence since the Assyrian Empire annihilated the Northern Kingdom of Israel over 2,700 years ago.  And yet Scripture addresses the rebirth of Ephraim and their reunification with Judah more than any other prophetic topic.  The Almighty Himself even stakes His own Name and reputation on fulfilling this mighty act (Deuteronomy 7:7-8; 9:5-6; Jeremiah 16:14-21, 32:41-42; Ezekiel 36:22-32).  The “time of the end” therefore must really be a “time of the beginning” as these children of Joseph (in Hebrew, b’ney Yosef) awaken to their identity and begin to come together as a nation once again.

Please click here to continue reading

SC National Shabbat Details!!

Bney Yosef National Shabbat 01For friends in the Southeast, here is another opportunity to gather with brethren who are taking YHVH seriously about His promise to regather and restore the entire nation of Israel. For those who are not in the Southeast, here’s an opportunity to pray in support of this initiative, and to seek the Father’s guidance on what more we should be doing. The question before us is this: Are we really Abraham’s seed, or not (Galatians 3:29)? If not, then pay no further attention. But if so, then ponder the implications of being adopted into the same family that became the nation of Israel. Ask the Father to explain what that means in terms of inheritance and obligations, and how that impacts our relationship with our Jewish brethren and with the State of Israel.

Two Sticks Forming 01And while pondering all that, make your plans now for the first weekend of December to be either in Elgin, SC, for the South Carolina National Shabbat, or in Denton, TX, for the B’Ney Yosef Region 35 Conference!

 


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2015-2016.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

natsab

Mark your calendar!!!  We have a venue and a band, and I am really excited to tell you about it!!  South Carolina will have a National Shabbat gathering!!

Rich, in Washington, DC, saw the need for a location and after calling them, emailed me with details of a campground in Elgin, SC owned by a Messianic for Messianics.  Interestingly, I met the owner, Ron Cowart, three years ago at a shofar making class I taught.  When we met, he shared his vision of a private campground available to Messianics for Sukkot and other gatherings.

I spoke with him this evening to discuss the facility and believe it is exactly what we need for this gathering.  So, here are the details we know so far!!  Mark your calendar!

Location: 1117 Flaming Arrow Rd, Elgin, SC 29045

Date: December 5, 2015

Time: 1 p.m. until 6+ p.m.

Music:

View original post 97 more words

…the land thou abhorrest shall be forsaken…

The United States of America is the land of my birth, but it is now a much different place than I knew as a boy.  Some of the changes have been good, and some not so good.  About a week ago, some immense changes happened not only in the way this nation defines marriage, but in the way it defines how the law of the land is established.  Many are the commentaries about the announcement on June 27 of the Supreme Court’s decision regarding same-sex marriage.  The commentaries I have seen which oppose the decision rightly emphasize the travesty of five jurists disregarding not only the will of the people of over half of the sovereign states of this Union, but the organic law of the Union itself.  In that sense, the Court’s decision reveals the true sin of Sodom.  Contrary to popular opinion, that sin is not homosexuality.  It is something else – something seemingly innocuous, but which, if unchecked, leads to complete abandonment of everything the Creator of this universe has deemed right.  The Lord explains this in a word to Judah and Jerusalem at the time of the Babylonian Conquest:

“As I live,” declares the Lord God, “Sodom, your sister and her daughters have not done as you and your daughters have done.  Behold, this was the guilt of your sister Sodom:  she and her daughters had arrogance, abundant food and careless ease, but she did not help the poor and needy.  Thus they were haughty and committed abominations before Me.  Therefore I removed them when I saw it.  (Ezekiel 16:48-50 NASB)

What this passage tells us is that Sodom’s sin was lawlessness.  The people of the city decided that they could determine what was right and wrong in their own eyes without regard to the true standards of righteousness established by their Creator.  That arrogance led to a simultaneous increase of wealth and of poverty as the people of Sodom enriched themselves at the expense of the needy.  Their world began to revolve around their stomachs and their pleasures, and in time that led to the abominable behaviors which triggered ultimate judgment.  This is the chain of moral dissolution the Apostle Paul traces in Romans 1:18-32.  If this is indeed so, then what the Supreme Court decided was merely an indicator of the corruption at the heart of our nation.

Who is to blame?  Everyone, of course.  We can start with the Body of Messiah, which is no less as arrogant and filled with selfishness as the rest of society.  With pious faces, we check the box of religious devotion so that we may with gusto engage to excess in our private indulgences.  That is a point in an excellent commentary by blogger Ed Cyzewski in his post, “The Supreme Court Just Gave American Evangelicals A Gift”

Another prescient commentary comes from Pete Rambo in, “…the land thou abhorrest shall be forsaken…”.  As usual, Pete examines the issue from a Hebraic perspective.  His post, reproduced below, contains much food for prayer and thought.  As you read it, consider the question, “Where do we go from here?”


. . . the land thou abhorrest shall be forsaken. . .

Pete Rambo

Posted on natsab, June 28, 2015

Yesterday’s Shabbat service and Torah study at Issachar Oasis in Irmo, SC was good.  That fellowship is studying through Isaiah as well as the weekly Torah portion and yesterday we covered Isaiah 7:14-16.  (Like the last prophet they studied, we’ll be in Isaiah for years…!)

Isa 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.  Butter and honey shall he eat, that he may know to refuse the evil, and choose the good.  For before the child shall know to refuse the evil, and choose the good, the land that thou abhorrest shall be forsaken of both her kings.

The focus of the leader and the group was the great hope we have in Messiah and the promise that Isaiah makes to Ahaz.  Glorious… but my eyes could not/would not leave the phrase “the land that thou abhorrest shall be forsaken…” and I was pondering the recent happenings in American jurisprudence.  For much of the world, and especially the United States, one has to have been under a rock not to know that two days ago the US Supreme Court issued a ruling legalizing gay marriage. Frankly, I was not surprised.  What surprised me was that there were actually four dissenters!  Never-the-less, the ruling is done and we have one more nail in the coffin of this once great nation. But, why “the land thou abhorrest…” you ask?  Pretty simple, really.  Israel and Judah were judged because they defiled the land.  They did so in many ways.  They

Please click here to continue reading

%d bloggers like this: