Tag Archive | Sermon on the Mount

Picture of the Week 01/11/19

What’s the connection between faith and authority? Ask a soldier.

 


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2019.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A Jewish Question for All of God’s People: “We were given the Torah, but have we received it?”

Jesus was perhaps the greatest Torah teacher of his day.

Think about that for a moment.  We do not often consider the fact that Yeshua haMashiach (Jesus Christ) taught from the Torah, and that he was recognized by Jewish leaders as a great teacher.  It began in his youth, when at the age of 12 he astounded the doctors of the Law (Torah) in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52).  When he entered into public ministry, the teacher of Israel himself came to inquire of Yeshua about spiritual matters (John 3:1-21).  His greatest oration, the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:1-7:29), was in fact an extensive midrash on the Torah and its application in daily life.  That is why Yeshua stated early in that sermon that he had not come to abolish the Law, but to fulfill it – meaning to teach it correctly and live out its full meaning (Matthew 5:17-20).

This should lead us to the conclusion the Torah was given not only to the Jews, but to all of God’s people.  In fact, the Torah applies to every person on earth, or at least it will when Messiah reigns from Jerusalem.  How else are we to understand such passages as this one from Isaiah?

Now it shall come to pass in the latter days that the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established on the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; and all nations shall flow to it.  Many people shall come and say, “Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob; He will teach us His ways, and we shall walk in His paths.”  For out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.  He shall judge between the nations, and rebuke many people; they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore.  (Isaiah 2:2-4 NKJV, emphasis added)

Notice the key to Isaiah’s oft-quoted prophecy:  universal peace does not happen until after the nations of the earth submit to the judgment of YHVH’s Messiah and learn and obey the Law (Torah) which he shall teach.

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Fox Byte 5776 #4: I’m Still Here

Jim Hawkins (voice by Joseph Gordon-Levitt) learns about the stars from John Silver (Brian Murray) in Treasure Planet, the 2002 Disney adaptation of Treasure Island. (Photo: Rotton Tomatoes)

Jim Hawkins (voice by Joseph Gordon-Levitt) learns about the stars from John Silver (Brian Murray) in Treasure Planet, the 2002 Disney adaptation of Treasure Island. (Photo: Rotten Tomatoes)

If Treasure Island is any indication, a young person’s transition to adulthood has always been awkward and painful.  At least it was so in the 1880s when Robert Louis Stevenson wrote his story for boys.  Stevenson’s adolescent hero, Jim Hawkins, has resonated with youth ever since.  What boy does not dream of adventure, travelling to exotic places, deciphering mysteries, and overcoming danger?  Such dreams have motivated boys for millennia in the hope that they can find their courage and discover their place in life.  If the opportunities are not forthcoming then boys will invent them, if for no other reason than to establish a place for themselves in their own minds and, hopefully, in the minds of their peers.

So it is with Jim Hawkins.  As the son of an innkeeper he has little hope of adventure until a strange turn of events sets him on a hazardous sea voyage in search of hidden pirate gold.  Jim proves to be the hero, thwarting the mutinous plot of rebellious sailors led by Long John Silver, saving the lives of the captain and loyal crew members, and discovering the treasure.  Not bad for an 18th century version of an underprivileged wayward teen.

Stevenson could not have envisioned the retelling of his story as a space travel adventure in which his hero is not merely underprivileged, but rebellious, sullen, introverted, and destined for a life at odds with society.  That is the Jim Hawkins of Treasure Planet, the 2002 animated feature by Walt Disney Pictures.  This space age Jim reflects the jaded, self-absorbed youth of the post-modern world.  We follow Jim’s transformation from wide-eyed, joyful toddler to embittered youth.  It is not a transformation he undertakes willingly.  It is not his fault that his parents quarrel, but he suffers incalculably on the morning his father walks out.  In an instant Jim is abandoned by the one person who could set him on the right course, leaving him to cast about for someone or something to give him purpose.  In time Long John Silver the pirate fills that role as the two of them develop a relationship that proves redemptive for them both.  There is a happy ending after all, but not without anguish along the way.

Jim’s angst is the subject of I’m Still Here, a song written for the film by John Rzeznik.  It is an anthem for an alienated generation which does not know its identity.  Cast adrift to find their own answers, these young people feel (with some justification) that their elders would rather they remain silent and invisible until they are able to join the adult world.  Yet how are they to do so if no one makes the effort to guide them?  Thus the youth have only two alternatives:  either despair and end their miserable lives, or hang on in defiance against all expectations.  Rzeznik’s lyrics tell us the option Jim Hawkins selects:

And you see the thing they never see,
All you wanted, I could be,
Now you know me, and I’m not afraid,
And I wanna tell you who I am,
Can you help me be a man? ,
They can’t break me,
As long as I know who I am.

The song ends with Jim’s defiant, yet hopeful, refrain, “I’m still here!”  His defiance is not unlike Job’s defiance in the face of what he perceives to be unjust accusations by his friends:

Teach me, and I will be silent; and show me how I have erred.  How painful are honest words!  But what does your argument prove?  Do you intend to reprove my words, when the words of one in despair belong to the wind?  (Job 6:24-26 NASB)

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Fox Byte 5775 #45: Va’etchanan (And I Pleaded)

וָאֶתְחַנַּן

Left to right: Vittorio Orlando (Italy), David Lloyd George (Great Britain), Georges Clemenceau (France), Woodrow Wilson (United States).In a sense one might say that this present global system is Woodrow Wilson’s fault.  The Armistice that ended the hostilities of World War I on November 11, 1918, took shape after the German Empire embraced President Wilson’s Fourteen Points as the basis for negotiating peace with the Allies.  Wilson had presented the Fourteen Points in a speech to Congress at the beginning of 1918 as his proposal for ending the war and reshaping the world so that such a massive conflict could never happen again.  A better world might have been the outcome had his plan been adopted in its entirety, but, sadly, it was not to be.  Wilson personally led the American negotiating team to the Paris Peace Conference at Versailles in 1919, but during the lengthy proceedings he became gravely ill.  The other Allied leaders took advantage of his illness to turn the peace conference into a revenge conference.  Many of Wilson’s principles found their way into the Versailles Treaty and subsequent agreements, but not as he intended.  The fruit of Versailles was a vindictive dismemberment of the German, Austro-Hungarian, and Ottoman empires, along with a humiliating disarmament of Germany and assessment of a war reparations debt that the German nation finally finished paying 92 years later.  The Versailles Treaty did incorporate Wilson’s vision of a League of Nations, the predecessor to the United Nations, but the President’s own people rejected it.  When the US Senate refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles, the United States turned away from an active role in managing the community of nations, thereby ensuring that the League of Nations would be nothing more than a hollow shell.

It is easy to summarize the Fourteen Points.  They call for open negotiations among nations, freedom of the seas, free trade, disarmament to the greatest extent possible, evacuation and restoration of territories occupied during the war; “autonomous development” (a fancy way of saying independence) of peoples under the rule of the world’s great empires, readjustment of borders to reflect lines of nationality, and establishment of the League of Nations to oversee this new international order.  The summary, however, does not convey the enormity of the tasks involved in implementing each point.  Consider just one point:  establishment of an independent Poland.  That single act required dismemberment of three empires; creation of a Polish government with power and resources to run the country; international recognition and assistance; and a host of other actions to ensure Poland’s unhindered reentry into the community of nations after nearly 120 years of foreign occupation.  It would be foolish to think that Wilson’s Fourteen Points were the only items under consideration in the Allies’ peace deliberations.  In truth, they were only the beginning of the process, not the end.

This should remind us of something in Scripture.  The analogy dawned immediately on President Georges Clemenceau of France.  On hearing of the Fourteen Points, he is reported to have said,

Quatorze?  Le bon Dieu n’a que dix.  (Fourteen?  The Good Lord only has ten.)

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Fox Byte 5774 #30: The Truth About Transformation

Transformers in the movies can change in an instant, but with God's people the process takes much more time and effort.

Transformers in the movies can change in an instant, but with God’s people the process takes much more time and effort.

What is Yeshua really teaching us through the Sermon on the Mount?  Yes, He explains that it’s good to be connected to the Maker of all life, but is His sermon an explanation of how to do that, or is it a picture of what happens when we really connect with our God?

As with so many things about our relationship with our Creator, the answer is “Yes”.

By now it should be clear that the basic details about how to live a godly life are not in Yeshua’s teaching.  The details are in the Torah.  In the Sermon on the Mount Yeshua takes the principles of Torah, which His audience knew very well, and clarifies them.  It’s not that He is teaching something entirely new, but that He is looking in a new way at what His Father originally delivered through Moses.  That is why He uses the format, “You have heard that it was said . . . but I tell you”.  Consider these next points:

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Fox Byte #29: An Eye For. . . .

BFB141008 Three MonkeysFrom what we have seen so far in the Sermon on the Mount, Yeshua is indeed correcting our understanding of what His Father really meant when He gave His Law (Torah) to Moses.  The attitude of our heart is the most important thing.  Specific commandments like, ”You shall not murder”, and “Bring your gift to the altar”, help us measure how far our heart has come toward operating the way God designed.  After all, that’s really what the Law is:  God’s operating instructions.  If we operate within the parameters of the Law (choose life), we get all kinds of good things (blessings); but if we operate outside His design parameters (choose death), we suffer all manner of consequences (curses). (Deuteronomy 30:11-20James 1:22-2:13).  If our heart is right with our Creator, then we will do His commandments naturally, as an act of love for Him.  And that is the exactly what the Apostle John, the Apostle Paul, and Yeshua Himself told us.

Yeshua continues his teaching by addressing another sticky point of human nature:

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Fox Byte #28: An Acceptable Sacrifice

When Abel and Cain offered sacrifices, both had meaning, but only one was acceptable.  (Bible Card illustration, "The Story of Cain and Abel")

When Abel and Cain offered sacrifices, both had meaning, but only one was acceptable. (Bible Card illustration, “The Story of Cain and Abel”)

If Yeshua really did make it possible to understand and live out God’s commandments (Torah) as our Creator originally intended, then we would expect Him to give us a few examples.  And in fact He did.  It’s all a matter of going beyond the “letter of the Law” and getting to the Spirit behind it.  Consider what Yeshua said right after He told His audience that their righteousness should exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees:

You have heard that it was said to those of old, “You shall not murder, and whoever murders will be in danger of the judgment.”  But I say to you that whoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment.  And whoever says to his brother, “Raca!” shall be in danger of the council.  But whoever says, “You fool!” shall be in danger of hell fire.  Therefore if you bring your gift to the altar, and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar, and go your way.  First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.  Agree with your adversary quickly, while you are on the way with him, lest your adversary deliver you to the judge, the judge hand you over to the officer, and you be thrown into prison.  Assuredly, I say to you, you will by no means get out of there till you have paid the last penny.  (Matthew 5:21-26 NKJV)

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Fox Byte #27: About That New Heart

The Tin Man's new "heart" was really a symbol of the change that had already happened in him.  Perhaps that is not too different from what happens in the heart transplant God accomplishes in His people.

The Tin Man’s new “heart” was really a symbol of the change that had already happened in him. Perhaps that is not too different from what happens in the heart transplant God accomplishes in His people.

What did Yeshua mean when He said He had come to fulfill the Law (Torah)?  Some people would say that He came to complete the Law so that it no longer applied to His followers.  But is that really what He meant?  Look again at what He said:

Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets.  I did not come to destroy but to fulfill.  For assuredly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, one jot or one tittle will by no means pass from the law till all is fulfilled.  (Matthew 5:17-18 NKJV, emphasis added)

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Fox Byte #26: Where Salt Gets Its Flavor

Making salt in China.  (www.cultural-china.com)

A Chinese way of making salt. (cultural-china.com)

Where would we look to find a connection between Christians and ancient Israel?  We need look no further than Messiah Himself.  That’s what God told Moses:

The Lord your God will raise up for you a Prophet like me from your midst, from your brethren.  Him you shall hear, according to all you desired of the Lord your God in Horeb in the day of the assembly, saying, “Let me not hear again the voice of the Lord my God, nor let me see this great fire anymore, lest I die.”  And the Lord said to me:  “What they have spoken is good.  I will raise up for them a Prophet like you from among their brethren, and will put My words in His mouth, and He shall speak to them all that I command Him.   And it shall be that whoever will not hear My words, which He speaks in My name, I will require it of him.  (Deuteronomy 18:15-19 NKJV, emphasis added)

This is a major prophecy quoted by both the Apostle Peter (Acts 3:22) and Stephen the Martyr (Acts 7:37) in their explanations about Yeshua’s identity as Messiah.  He is like Moses in that He speaks the Word of God directly to the people, but He is greater than Moses because He is God Himself.  This is something Christians should have no problem understanding.  But why is it that Jews have a problem with it?

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Fox Byte #25: When Peculiar is a Good Thing

Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, one of Hollywood's most peculiar (and successful) comedy teams.  From the 1937 movie Way Out West (source:  TimeOut.com)

Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, one of Hollywood’s most peculiar (and successful) comedy teams. From their 1937 movie Way Out West (source: TimeOut.com)

At this point someone might say, “Wait a minute!  That old Law of Moses doesn’t apply to Christians!”

Are we really sure about that?  How can we even know that Yeshua is Messiah if we don’t study the Law of Moses?  After all, Yeshua Himself said:

Do not think that I shall accuse you to the Father; there is one who accuses you—Moses, in whom you trust.  For if you believed Moses, you would believe Me; for he wrote about Me.  But if you do not believe his writings, how will you believe My words?”  (John 5:45-47 NKJV)

If what Yeshua says is true, then Moses is a very important person in God’s eyes.  Maybe we should pay more attention to him.  At least we should pay attention to those parts of his writings that have to do with Yeshua.  Or maybe we could start with what Yeshua taught and see where Moses taught it first.  That might give us a clue as to what Yeshua meant.

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