Fox Byte 5775 #15: Bo (Go)

בֹּא

Donkeys in Transition.  Top left:  James Cagney as Nick Bottom, with Anita Louise as Titania in the 1935 production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream (via “The Many Faces of Nick Bottom” on Shakespeare Talks).  Top right:  Pinocchio turns into a donkey, from the 1940 Walt Disney film, Pinocchio, via The Disney Wiki.  Bottom Left:  Donkey (voiced by Eddie Murphy) in Shrek the Third (via HD Wallpapers).  Bottom Right:  Donkey as Stallion in Shrek II (via Wiki Shrek).
Donkeys in Transition. Top left: James Cagney as Nick Bottom with Anita Louise as Titania in the 1935 production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream (via “The Many Faces of Nick Bottom” on Shakespeare Talks). Top right: Pinocchio turns into a donkey, from the 1940 Walt Disney film, Pinocchio, via The Disney Wiki. Bottom Left: Donkey (voiced by Eddie Murphy) in Shrek the Third (via HD Wallpapers). Bottom Right: Donkey as Stallion in Shrek II (via Wiki Shrek).

Is there anything more ridiculous among beasts of burden than a donkey?  They are hardly the picture of a noble animal.  On the contrary, they are loud, obnoxious, stubborn, homely (not exactly ugly, but certainly not beautiful), and they smell bad.  It is no coincidence that William Shakespeare places a donkey’s head on the foolishly self-confident Nick Bottom in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.  Neither is it a coincidence that in The Adventures of Pinocchio Carlo Collodi chose to transform foolish boys into donkeys.  Walt Disney offered a simple explanation of this process in his 1940 film version of Pinocchio:  “Give a bad boy enough rope, and he’ll soon make a jackass of himself.”  And then there is the companion of the ogre Shrek:  the carefree, friendly, and unbearably annoying Donkey, brought to life by the vocal talents of Eddie Murphy.  In the second film of the Shrek series Donkey is changed into a white stallion, but the change is only outward.  Inside he is still the same Donkey:  kindhearted, loyal, and eager to please, but seldom aware of the chaos that follows him at every step.

With such a pedigree it is a wonder that donkeys receive favorable attention in Scripture.  In fact, the lowly donkey and the lamb are the only animals mentioned by name in God’s instructions on how to remember the Exodus.

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The Apostle Paul Revisited: Paul’s Argument with Jesus, Part III

This is the third in a series comparing the words of Yeshua and Paul regarding the Law (Torah) of God.

"The Chief Priests Take Counsel Together" James Tissot
“The Chief Priests Take Counsel Together”
James Tissot

The Very Jewish Paul

Was Paul hopelessly confused on the question of the Law of God?  No, not at all.  The confusion comes when we attempt to view him as a man who walked away from Judaism after he met Yeshua on the road to Damascus.  That is not true.  Paul remained an observant Jew until the end of his life, as we know from his own words:

But Paul said, “I am a Jew from Tarsus, in Cilicia, a citizen of no mean city; and I implore you, permit me to speak to the people.”  (Acts 21:39 NKJV, emphasis added)

But when Paul perceived that one part were Sadducees and the other Pharisees, he cried out in the council, “Men and brethren, I am a Pharisee, the son of a Pharisee; concerning the hope and resurrection of the dead I am being judged!”  (Acts 23:6 NKJV, emphasis added)

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The Curse of Jeconiah

Jeremiah Confronts the King W.A. Foster
Jeremiah Confronts the King
W.A. Foster

If God really wanted people to read the Bible, why did He include all those boring parts?  Why, for example, do we have to wade through all those genealogies?  Even the Apostolic Scriptures (New Testament) start with a genealogy – 17 verses listing the generations from Abraham to Yeshua (Jesus).  Most of the people don’t even appear anywhere else in the Bible, so why are they there in Matthew 1?  Consider this list of strange names:

And after they were brought to Babylon, Jeconiah begot Shealtiel, and Shealtiel begot Zerubbabel.  (Matthew 1:12 NKJV)

What is so important about those three men that they get a special mention in the genealogy of Yeshua?

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Silent Night in September

"The Angel Gabriel Appearing to Zacharias" William Blake
The Angel Gabriel Appearing to Zacharias
William Blake

At some point in my youth I grew curious about why we Christians celebrate Christmas in December.  When I asked my elders where to find Christmas in the Bible, they pointed me to Luke 2 and Matthew 2.  Although those famous passages explained the details of Jesus’ birth, neither they nor anyone I asked could explain how those accounts got translated into the festivities of December 25.  The best answer I got was something like this, “We really don’t know when Jesus was born.  It probably wasn’t in the winter, but since we don’t really know, December 25 is as good a day as any.”

That answer never satisfied my curiosity as a child, and it should not satisfy any serious believer in Jesus, especially when we consider the high quality of Luke’s gospel.  Dr. Luke was a meticulous scholar who recorded great detail both in his gospel and in the book of Acts.  His accounts, such as those in the first two chapters of his gospel, included evidence he had acquired from people who witnessed the events.  In particular, he must have talked with Mary the mother of Jesus to understand her thoughts and words.  How is it possible, that she would forget when her Son was born, or that Luke would not tell us that detail?  It truth, it is not possible to overlook such an important detail, and in fact Luke did tell us.  All we need to understand the answer is a little Bible knowledge, not only of the scriptures, but of the Hebraic context in which they were written.  Most of what we need is in Luke 1, with a little help from I Chronicles 24.  We begin with the story of a priest in the Temple at Jerusalem: Please click here to continue reading