The Apostle Paul Revisited: Paul’s Argument with Jesus, Part III

This is the third in a series comparing the words of Yeshua and Paul regarding the Law (Torah) of God.

"The Chief Priests Take Counsel Together" James Tissot
“The Chief Priests Take Counsel Together”
James Tissot

The Very Jewish Paul

Was Paul hopelessly confused on the question of the Law of God?  No, not at all.  The confusion comes when we attempt to view him as a man who walked away from Judaism after he met Yeshua on the road to Damascus.  That is not true.  Paul remained an observant Jew until the end of his life, as we know from his own words:

But Paul said, “I am a Jew from Tarsus, in Cilicia, a citizen of no mean city; and I implore you, permit me to speak to the people.”  (Acts 21:39 NKJV, emphasis added)

But when Paul perceived that one part were Sadducees and the other Pharisees, he cried out in the council, “Men and brethren, I am a Pharisee, the son of a Pharisee; concerning the hope and resurrection of the dead I am being judged!”  (Acts 23:6 NKJV, emphasis added)

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Assorted Antichrists

BFB140217 Types of AntichristIt is a peculiar thing that the book of Esther does not mention God, particularly since the hand of God is evident throughout the story.  In brief, the story is that Haman, the Grand Vizier of Persia in the reign of King Xerxes, became consumed with hatred at the Jews because Esther’s kinsman Mordechai refused to bow down to him.  Haman determined to gain revenge not only against Mordechai, but against all the Jews.  His plan was to manipulate the king into issuing a decree that on the thirteenth day of the month of Adar all the enemies of the Jews throughout the Persian Empire could rise up and kill them.  God’s plan of salvation was already in motion for He had brought Esther in to the palace as Xerxes’ new queen.  He worked through Esther to reveal Haman’s plot to the king.  At the king’s order, Haman and his sons were executed, and Mordechai and Esther had authority to issue another decree in the king’s name for the Jews to rise up against their enemies on the very day that they were to have been slaughtered.  Since that time, Jews have celebrated the feast of Purim every year on the fourteenth day of Adar. Please click here to continue reading

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