Tag Archive | Hebrews

After the Fox! Two New Projects About the Torah Awakening

Has anyone noticed The Barking Fox hasn’t posted much in recent months? It may be that the only one who has noticed is your humble author. Aside from self-generated deadlines and publication goals, there is no pressure to maintain the pace of posting up to three times each week. That’s very good when other surprising opportunities appear out of nowhere.

Two such unexpected opportunities arrived last spring: a new radio show, and a new book.

Reunion Roadmap

The radio show is Reunion Roadmap, the weekly broadcast by B’ney Yosef North America (BYNA). As reported here, Reunion Roadmap features high-quality worship music, encouraging testimonies of Torah followers from around North America, and uplifting teaching by BYNA’s Elders.

The show came into existence at the invitation of Eddie Chumney, founder of Hebraic Heritage Ministries. He had the idea of establishing Hebraic Roots Radio as an internet broadcasting forum for teaching, worship music, and more. Eddie’s invitation came as we were praying about how to proceed with our vision of connecting the people of the emerging House of Ephraim here in North America. It took two months to establish and refine the concept of the show and prepare for our first broadcast in mid-June. Now Reunion Roadmap is on the air every Saturday and Sunday evening at 9:00 p.m. Eastern on Hebraic Heritage Radio, and Saturday at 9:00 p.m. Pacific on Hebrew Nation Radio. Podcasts of the show are available on the BYNA web site at:

https://bneyyosefna.com/category/byna-radio-reunion-roadmap/.

As you may imagine, being part of a dynamic production team preparing a pre-recorded radio show each week is a time-consuming process. That, however, is not the only project eating into the time and energy previously invested in blog posts. The other major project is –

Ten Parts in the King: The Prophesied Reconciliation of God’s Two Witnesses

My friend and colleague Pete Rambo, creator of the blog, natsab.com, had an idea early in 2014 to write a book, “articulating and defending from Scripture the message of ‘The Prophesied Reconciliation of God’s Two Witnesses.’” Pete made that statement in an article he wrote as the inaugural post on our new website, Ten Parts in the King (https://tenpartsintheking.com/).

We created the web site to promote our forthcoming book, Ten Parts in the King: The Prophesied Reconciliation of God’s Two Witnesses. It took over three years to come to the point when we could actually write the book, but we finally realized early this spring that the time had arrived. We have worked all summer to write this important work that explains from Scripture who the Two Witnesses are, what they have to do with the Torah Awakening among Christians, and why they are essential to the Kingdom process of redemption.

Who are the two witnesses? We believe they are none other than the House of Judah and the House of Israel, the parties mentioned in the famous New Covenant in Hebrews 8:8-12 and Jeremiah 31:31-34. That Covenant, as explained by Jeremiah, is this:

“Behold, days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah, not like the covenant which I made with their fathers in the day I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt, My covenant which they broke, although I was a husband to them,” declares the Lord. “But this is the covenant which I will make with the house of Israel after those days,” declares the Lord, “I will put My law within them and on their heart I will write it; and I will be their God, and they shall be My people. They will not teach again, each man his neighbor and each man his brother, saying, ‘Know the Lord,’ for they will all know Me, from the least of them to the greatest of them,” declares the Lord, “for I will forgive their iniquity, and their sin I will remember no more.” (Jeremiah 31:31-34 NASB, emphasis added)

Our years of study, first as Christians in the traditional church and now as Torah-honoring followers of Messiah Yeshua, has brought us to the conclusion that God’s plan of redemption involves two parts of His covenant nation of Israel: the Jewish House of Judah, and the non-Jewish House of Israel (also known as the House of Joseph and House of Ephraim). The Two Houses are two witnesses YHVH has established to share with the world two distinct testimonies of His ability and willingness to redeem all of humanity.

How does this work? That’s what this book explains!

Our intent is to have Ten Parts in the King available by the end of this year (2017). Even now we are going through that tedious, yet necessary, process of the final copy editing to get the manuscript ready for print. If you would like to know more, visit the web site! There you can sign up to receive publication updates, news about preorders, and notifications of new articles and features. In fact, you can already see how we came up with this peculiar name, Ten Parts in the King. That story is in an excerpt from the book posted here:

https://tenpartsintheking.com/2017/10/10/pictured-in-a-parable/#more-112

And that’s what The Barking Fox has been doing all summer! You may not see a return to the frequency of posts as in recent years, but that’s because Pete and I have combined our efforts to do our part in our God’s redemptive Kingdom process!


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2014-2018.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Picture of the Week 09/05/17

Understanding context requires a lot more effort than we are generally willing to expend.


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Picture of the Week 07/05/17

Did you ever have anyone tell you they can’t see why you believe the way you do? Maybe the real issue isn’t what you believe, but Who you believe.

 


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Picture of the Week 04/21/17

We assume that the older brother in the Parable of the Prodigal Son was the one with the birthright, but what if the father had given it to the younger brother? If that’s the case, then redemption takes on a whole new level of meaning.


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Picture of the Week 03/14/17

An All-Powerful Creator God certainly has the ability to take on human form, but why exactly would He do such a thing?


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The State of Israel and Ephraim’s Awakening: An Academic Investigation by Stephen Hindes

The concept of the "nation-state" was a product of the Peace of Westphalia, which ended the Thirty Years War in 1648. The nation-state, however, is not the ultimate expression of God's Kingdom order. (The Ratification of the Treaty of Münster, Gerard Terborch.)

The concept of the “nation-state” was a product of the Peace of Westphalia, which ended the Thirty Years War in 1648. The nation-state, however, is not the ultimate expression of God’s Kingdom order. (The Ratification of the Treaty of Münster, by Gerard Terborch.)

Thinking is hard.  If it were not hard, then more people would do it.

In truth, all of us prefer to remain in our comfort zones, where familiar things surround us – including familiar answers to questions and familiar solutions to familiar problems.  Most likely this preference for the familiar, the things we know and can deal with well enough, is a big reason few people take an active role in making the way for Messiah to come.

That last statement is bound to generate opposition.  Those who view it from the Christian side (including Messianic and Hebrew Roots believers) will say that Yeshua of Nazareth (Jesus Christ) is the Messiah (Christ means Messiah, by the way), that he has come once, and that he will be coming back.  Those who approach from the Jewish side say that Messiah is yet to come.  The point of this article is not to address either perspective, but to consider something both have in common:  the faithful expectation that Messiah Son of David is coming as King of Israel to rule the nations from Zion.

If we all have this common expectation, then it would be wise to consider what that future Messianic realm will look like.  Maybe we should even consider what we have to do to make it happen.

This is where we run into the hard part.  We have to think about it, and that is scary and uncomfortable.  Those of us who have come from the Christian side have lived our lives expecting Messiah to return and fix everything.  According to our expectations, there is no effort required on our part to bring him here; he just shows up one day according to some predetermined timetable God established from the beginning.  To think, like our Jewish brethren, that we have responsibility for creating the conditions for Messiah’s coming (or return) requires a major paradigm shift.  It means we must step out in faith and do things that we usually leave up to God alone.

But then, that is the consistent testimony of Scripture –

  • Noah had to do things to secure the salvation of his family (such as think about how to follow the instructions God gave him to build that very large boat, and then actually do the work).
  • Abraham had to do things to receive the promises God gave him (such as pack up and leave comfortable, civilized Mesopotamia, and go to a hostile foreign land – first in Syria, and then in Canaan).
  • Moses had to do things to receive God’s instructions for the nation of Israel (such as walk to Egypt, then convince the elders of the people that God had spoken to him, and then seek an audience with Pharaoh – and that was only the beginning of the work he had to do!)

There are many more examples summarized in Hebrews 11.  The people in that “Hall of Faith” chapter deserve praise not because they sat around waiting for God to move, but because they got up and did the moving themselves in response to God’s promises.  As they moved, He provided direction, resources, help from others, and miraculous intervention when necessary.  Yet would YHVH have done so if they had not invested their own blood, sweat, treasure, and intellectual effort?

Probably not.  In fact, when God’s people sat around waiting for Him to move, He had to take extreme action just to get them off their backsides and into motion!  We see that in the record of the apostles.  Even though Yeshua had told them to be his witnesses in Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria, and to the ends of the earth, they were content to remain in Jerusalem until God raised up a man named Saul of Tarsus who forced them out (see Acts 8).

Which brings us to the dilemma of the present day.  Are we really at the “end of the age”, when Messiah is about to show up?  If so, what does that mean?  More importantly, what are we to do about it?  How do we prepare for Messiah’s reign in what will be a very real Kingdom centered in a very real place called Jerusalem?  What will this Kingdom look like?  How will it resemble what we know today in the modern nation-state system?  How will it be different?

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Israel 2016: In Search of Hebrew Roots Judaism

General Douglas MacArthur wades ashore on Leyte, Philippine Islands, in October 1944 to keep his promised, "I shall return".

General Douglas MacArthur wades ashore on Leyte, Philippine Islands, in October 1944 to keep his promised, “I shall return”.

There is a joke from World War II that no longer makes sense without some explanation.  It is said that a foreign student at an American university wrote an essay about General Douglas MacArthur.  In the early months of 1942, as MacArthur presided over a doomed defense of the Philippine Islands, he was ordered to leave his command and go to Australia, there to organize the multinational Allied force that would halt Japanese expansion in the South Pacific.  At his departure, MacArthur reportedly promised the people of the Philippines and his Filipino and American troops that he would one day come back with an army to liberate them – which he did two years later.  On that momentous day in 1942, though, all he could do was promise, “I shall return.”

Those were inspiring words to Americans about to lose their forward bases and their largest military force in the Far East, and who could not bear to lose with them one of the most senior officers of their Army.  MacArthur’s words inspired this young foreign student as well.  However, his knowledge of English being imperfect, he conducted his research in his native tongue, and therefore committed an unfortunate faux pas when he presented his paper.  Standing proudly in front of his peers, the young man said, “I write about Douglas MacArthur, who said those famous words, ‘I’ll be right back!’”

What is the proper response in such a situation?  If there is no offense, then laughter erupts.  However, if the hearers take offense, then they respond in anger.

It may be that neither is the proper response.  If the one who made the error is trying to communicate in good faith, then the audience should give grace, seek to understand the true message, and help the author overcome the error.  That is the point behind King Solomon’s wise words:

Hatred stirs up strife, but love covers all sins.  (Proverbs 10:12 NKJV; see also Proverbs 17:9)

Solomon’s observation is rooted in a Torah principle:

You shall not curse the deaf, nor put a stumbling block before the blind, but shall fear your God:  I am the Lord.  (Leviticus 19:14 NKJV)

Jewish sages understand that this principle refers not only to the physically deaf and blind, but also to people who cannot hear or see things clearly.  Perhaps they are not present when something is said, or perhaps they do not have the language or experience to grasp the intricacies of a subject under discussion.  Consider, for example, a man who is brilliant in his native language, but struggles to order a cup of coffee in English, and is laughed to scorn by those who do not realize the importance of being kind to strangers (another Torah principle).

To be honest, Jews are strangers to me, and I am a stranger to Jews.  Although I identify as a Hebrew Roots follower of Messiah Yeshua, I have yet to grasp the intricacies of Judaism.  The more Jews I meet and get to know, the more I begin to understand, but always what I say and do is tempered with the fear that I may give offense in some way that I had never anticipated.

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Pictures for Pondering II

Connecting the dots in Scripture can be lots of fun – and challenging. The fun part is the “Aha!” moment when something finally makes sense. The challenging part is when that “Aha!” moment presents a different picture from what we have learned all our lives. Do we take that new revelation and run with it, knowing it can make waves, or do we set it aside and hope that it never comes up again?

This second offering of Pictures for Pondering may be a challenge. As with the first edition, posted last spring, these are images from Bible passages prepared originally for posting on YouVersion (the Bible App). The first edition presented some interesting perspectives on the Kingdom of Heaven, Law and Grace, and prophecy, but also some whimsical illustrations. This time there is an attempt at a unifying theme. Part of the challenge is identifying that theme. The other part is investigating it from Scripture to see if it is so.

Good hunting!

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If the foundations are destroyed, what can the righteous do?

Here’s what is coming up on The Remnant Road on Hebrew Nation Radio for Monday, July 18:

160718 Dai Sup Han - Intercession in the Face of Lawlessness

It is a dangerous world, both at home and abroad. Everything that we have considered to be good, stable, precious, and unmovable now seems to be questionable, changeable, worthless, and fragmented. This is no surprise to Bible students; the Almighty put us on notice long ago that He would shake the heavens, the earth, the sea, the dry land, and all nations (Haggai 2:6-7; Hebrews 12:25-29).

In expectation of that shaking, the Psalmist asks: “If the foundations are destroyed, what can the righteous do?” (Psalm 11:3) Truly, what can the righteous do in the face of unrelenting terrorist attacks, the slaughter of innocents in their beds, outpouring of rage at centuries of real and perceived injustice, and the sanction of lawlessness by our judges and governors?

The first answer should be, “Pray”. But how do we pray – to perpetuate an increasingly godless system, or to reform it, or to see it removed and something better put in its place? And where does repentance fit in this process?

This is the setting for our conversation with Dai Sup Han, founder of Prayer Surge Now!, an intercessory network devoted to uniting the people of God in concerted prayer to address the issues of this present world. Listen as Dai Sup shares his heart for the Body of Messiah and its role in the healing of this very sick and hurting world.

Remnant Road 01The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn and Daniel Holdings, is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2016.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A Jewish Question for All of God’s People: “We were given the Torah, but have we received it?”

Jesus was perhaps the greatest Torah teacher of his day.

Think about that for a moment.  We do not often consider the fact that Yeshua haMashiach (Jesus Christ) taught from the Torah, and that he was recognized by Jewish leaders as a great teacher.  It began in his youth, when at the age of 12 he astounded the doctors of the Law (Torah) in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52).  When he entered into public ministry, the teacher of Israel himself came to inquire of Yeshua about spiritual matters (John 3:1-21).  His greatest oration, the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:1-7:29), was in fact an extensive midrash on the Torah and its application in daily life.  That is why Yeshua stated early in that sermon that he had not come to abolish the Law, but to fulfill it – meaning to teach it correctly and live out its full meaning (Matthew 5:17-20).

This should lead us to the conclusion the Torah was given not only to the Jews, but to all of God’s people.  In fact, the Torah applies to every person on earth, or at least it will when Messiah reigns from Jerusalem.  How else are we to understand such passages as this one from Isaiah?

Now it shall come to pass in the latter days that the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established on the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; and all nations shall flow to it.  Many people shall come and say, “Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob; He will teach us His ways, and we shall walk in His paths.”  For out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.  He shall judge between the nations, and rebuke many people; they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore.  (Isaiah 2:2-4 NKJV, emphasis added)

Notice the key to Isaiah’s oft-quoted prophecy:  universal peace does not happen until after the nations of the earth submit to the judgment of YHVH’s Messiah and learn and obey the Law (Torah) which he shall teach.

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