Tag Archive | FIddler on the Roof

To My Daughter the Bride: A Lesson in Chosenness

 

My first encounter with a chuppa was watching Norman Jewison's 1971 film adaptation of Fiddler on the Roof. I did not understand at the time the significance of the canopy over the bride and groom. (© 1971 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

My first encounter with a chuppa was in Norman Jewison’s 1971 film adaptation of Fiddler on the Roof. I did not understand at the time the significance of the canopy over the bride and groom.  (© 1971 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

Yesterday morning, as I reviewed the news over breakfast, something unusual caught my eye.  It wasn’t actually a news item, but it did appear in one of my usual news sources.  There on the sidebar of The Times of Israel web page was this article with the title, “To My Daughter Under the Chupa”.  As soon as I saw it, I thought, “Hey!  In about a month I’ll have a daughter standing under a chupa.  Maybe I should read this.”

I did read it, and I was greatly blessed.  It is the speech Rabbi Shmuley Boteach presented recently at the wedding of his daughter.  What I found in his remarks was something I have come to expect in Jewish biblical exposition:  a profound depth of truth and wisdom that not only supports, but to a great extent completes what I learned in my Christian upbringing.

Perhaps it would be good to explain what a chupa is.  It can also be spelled chuppa.  The Hebrew pronunciation is difficult for an English speaker, but saying “hoopa” is close enough.  One reputable Jewish source explains the chuppa this way:

The chuppah is a tapestry attached to the tops of four poles.  The word chuppah means covering or protection, and is intended as a roof or covering for the bride and groom at their wedding.

The chuppah is not merely a charming folk custom, a ceremonial object carried over from a primitive past.  It serves a definite, though complicated, legal purpose:  It is the decisive act that formally permits the couple’s new status of marriage to be actualized, and it is the legal conclusion of the marriage process that began with betrothal. . . .

Chuppah symbolizes the groom’s home, and the bride’s new domain.  More specifically, the chuppah symbolizes the bridal chamber, where the marital act was consummated in ancient times.

– Chabad.org, The Bridal Canopy (Chuppah)

This helps explain what I mean when I say that Jewish learning complements my Christian learning.  What I mean in this case is that the pastors and teachers I have been blessed to know have consistently taught me that I am part of the Bride of Christ.  What they did not teach me was what that means.  To understand this requires a Hebraic perspective that takes into account the entire record of Scripture from Genesis to Revelation.  That is where the Jewish learning comes in.  The rabbis know that Israel is the chosen of God, and that He will betroth her as His bride.  What the rabbis and the pastors together could not have known until now is that this blessed betrothed one, the Israel of the rabbis and the Church of the pastors, is the same corporate body of believers joined together in the covenant sealed with the blood of YHVH’s Anointed.

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After the Fox: A Long-Expected Transition

BFB160803 Barking Fox MoveReaders of The Barking Fox may have noticed that the blog posts have become sparse recently.  Why is that?  To paraphrase Tevye of Fiddler on the Roof, “That I can tell you in one word:  Transition!”

Big changes are happening this summer in almost every area.  In the space of about six months, we will have seen one child graduate from college, another one get married, and both of them relocate to new residences.  We also are relocating after four years in Texas; early in September we will set up housekeeping in Charlotte, North Carolina.  About a month after that, we set off for Israel to celebrate the Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot), followed immediately by the Second B’ney Yosef National Congress.

Why the big changes?  Our connection with B’ney Yosef North America (BYNA) is the main reason for many of these transitions.  Although our leadership is spread out across the US and Canada, most of the Executive Council live in the Southeastern US.  Since we have the opportunity to relocate this year, it makes sense to set up housekeeping nearer to the people with whom we work, and Charlotte is a great central location.  We will miss Texas, but we look forward to being able to meet face-to-face with many of our Executives and Elders on a more regular basis.

BY-NA-Med 03And what exactly is happening with BYNA?  Much that you will learn about very soon!  We are in the process of updating our website.  If you go there (http://bneyyosefna.com) you will see some interesting new features:

These are the first of a number of exciting developments that will be unveiled in the next several months.  As they become available, The Barking Fox will pass on the news – while at the same time continuing to post commentary on current events, Scriptural topics, and other items of interest.

Thanks to you, readers, for your patience and your encouragement!  Even in the midst of this great transition, it is a joy to be the voice behind the Fox!


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2016.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Fox Byte #19: Rusty Priorities

Tevye the Milkman Chaim Topol in Norman Jewison's 1971 film adaptation of Fiddler on the Roof

Chaim Topol as Tevye the Milkman in Norman Jewison’s 1971 film adaptation of Fiddler on the Roof

What kind of good fruit does Yeshua expect His followers to produce?  The kind that produces lasting change for good.  That’s what He meant when He said we are the salt of the earth and the light of the world (Matthew 5:13-16).

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The Apostle Paul Revisited: Paul’s Argument with Jesus, Part III

This is the third in a series comparing the words of Yeshua and Paul regarding the Law (Torah) of God.

The Very Jewish Paul

Was Paul hopelessly confused on the question of the Law of God?  No, not at all.  The confusion comes when we attempt to view him as a man who walked away from Judaism after he met Yeshua on the road to Damascus.  That is not true.  Paul remained an observant Jew until the end of his life, as we know from his own words:

But Paul said, “I am a Jew from Tarsus, in Cilicia, a citizen of no mean city; and I implore you, permit me to speak to the people.”  (Acts 21:39 NKJV, emphasis added)

But when Paul perceived that one part were Sadducees and the other Pharisees, he cried out in the council, “Men and brethren, I am a Pharisee, the son of a Pharisee; concerning the hope and resurrection of the dead I am being judged!”  (Acts 23:6 NKJV, emphasis added)

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