When Brothers Don’t Get Along

On December 4, 2015, the B’Ney Yosef Region 35 Conference convened at Camp Copass in Denton, Texas, for the purpose of bringing together people in the central part of the United States to seek YHVH’s direction about His Kingdom work at this time.  The initial concept was to continue in the spirit of the First B’Ney Yosef National Congress in the interest of building Ephraimite (Israelite) identity among believers in Messiah Yeshua.  The Holy Spirit quickly expanded that concept into a call for repentance within the Hebrew Roots/Two House movement and reconciliation with other parts of the body of Messiah, particularly with our Christian brethren.  That was the motivation for this address which opened the conference.

BFB151204 MNF-IThe best boss I ever had was the man under whose supervision I served the last time I was in Iraq.  He was also the most profane man I have ever met.  The name of Jesus Christ was for him but one weapon in a formidable arsenal of expletives.  Not a single day passed that some outrage did not fall from his lips, causing my ears to burn and my heart to wonder how long I would have to endure such offense.  And yet I continued in his service, not merely because I had no choice (both of us, after all, were soldiers assigned to serve together), but because God gave me grace to look beyond the offense to see and benefit from the substantial qualities he possessed.  Those qualities included an encyclopedic knowledge of intelligence functions and procedures based on decades of hard experience.  He possessed as well a dogged determination to persevere through all opposition and achieve success in whatever goal he or his superiors established.  That determination sprang from his undying loyalty to the United States of America, and to his belief in the ultimate good of our mission in Iraq.  Yet none of that would have mattered in the least had this man lacked the greatest quality of all:  he regarded every person as having intrinsic value, and as a potential ally in achieving the goals set before him.  He may have spoken roughly, and even in private moments vented his frustration and anger, but he never diminished the value of the human beings in his charge, nor of those under whom he served.

We had occasion to work with military and civilian officials from a number of services and agencies.  Whether they were Army like us, or Marines, Air Force, or Navy, they were all “great Americans” in my boss’s opinion – if for no other reason than because they had volunteered to wear the uniform and be deployed to a Middle Eastern war zone.  He could not call our British, Australian, and German colleagues “great Americans”, but he did hold them in high esteem – while at the same time recognizing that the highest priorities for each of them were the interests of their own nations, not those of the United States.  The true professionals among us, regardless of nationality, recognized this.  We knew that at times there would be questions we could not ask and answers we could not give, but whenever and wherever possible we helped one another.

That “great American” description did extend to the civilian intelligence professionals we encountered.  Those men and women represented nearly all of the 16 agencies of the U.S. Intelligence Community.  The ones you would expect were all there:  each of the agencies of the military services, the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the National Security Agency (NSA), the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGIA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the State Department.  Our office dealt mostly with the CIA, whom my boss lovingly called, “Klingons”.  Like our foreign counterparts, they, and all the other intelligence agencies, had their own priorities which were not necessarily the same as ours in the Department of Defense.  Their vision of how to support the national interests of the United States sometimes clashed with ours, and the means and resources at their disposal often put them at an advantage over us.  We had much reason to distrust them, but we had even more reason to work with them – just as the Start Trek heroes found reason to cooperate with the Klingons to defeat their common enemies.

We laugh at the description of the CIA as Klingons, but long before I arrived in Iraq I understood exactly what my boss meant.  Early in my tenure in Washington, DC, I had occasion to work with the CIA on a joint project.  Most of the people with whom I worked were intelligence analysts, people not very different from myself.  They were well educated, often from privileged backgrounds, highly academic (a reflection of the CIA culture), and professionally courteous.  As part of our project we had to consult with a different type of CIA employee.  This person was not an analyst.  Intelligence analysts look at information from various sources and put it together in different ways to understand what it means.  They are the friendly face of the CIA.  There is another face, however, and it is not very friendly.  That face belongs to the operators, the men and women who go about the difficult business of collecting the information.  They are consummate professionals, very good at what they do, but they are not the kind of people you would want in your social circle.  Quite often the name by which they introduce themselves is not the name their parents gave them at birth.  In the course of their duties they will have to do some questionable things, and perhaps even some very unpleasant things, to acquire information their agency has commissioned them to gain.

This was the kind of person with whom we met in that office on the CIA campus in Langley, Virginia long ago.  He was an impressive man, and one whom I admired for his courage and devotion to his country.  I could tell without asking that he had suffered much personal loss in service to the nation, and that my own poor service paled in comparison to his.  Yet we could not be friends, and we would have difficulty working together as colleagues.  His world was one I could not enter, and my world was one he would not find comfortable.  Nevertheless, my work could not continue without him, and without me his work would have no meaning.  That is why I have never forgotten the man, although our paths have never crossed since that day.

BFB151204 US Intelligence CommunityWhat would happen if this vast intelligence community in the service of the United States of America ceased to function as designed?  What if the various individuals and organizations within it forgot that they were all Americans, and instead placed their own personal agendas, or the name and reputation of their own agencies and services, above the interests of the country?  That is not a rhetorical question; I can tell you what would happen.  I have seen it.  What happens is a fragmentation of the national intelligence establishment. 

For the most part that establishment consists of good, honest people trying to do the best they can with limited resources and time.  They have a tendency to focus exclusively on the work right in front of them, whether it is office administration, counterterrorism analysis, national technical means of information collection, the number of tanks in the Russian Far Eastern Military District, or poppy production in Afghanistan.  They forget that there is a wider world out there, and that their work is but one small piece in a very, very big puzzle.  It does not take much to convince them that their piece is the most important.  Once convinced, it is but a small step toward competing with others to gain a greater share of attention and resources.  Having entered that arena, it is nothing to begin pushing others aside in ever more aggressive ways, taking resources and people away from them so that one’s own piece of the puzzle grows in size and importance, and the competitors’ pieces shrink, or disappear altogether.  In time the picture that emerges is distorted at best, magnifying certain things to the extreme, diminishing others, and ignoring important bits that would otherwise tie together the seemingly contradictory reports from various sources.  That is the picture which goes before high level decision makers like the commanders of our forces in the Middle East, and even the President himself.  Is it any wonder, therefore, that we have national disasters such as the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001?

My lesson from this should be clear.  National defense is a team effort.  I know my part of the effort, and my job is to do it to the best of my ability.  I do not know most of the millions of others involved in the effort, nor do I understand what they do.  I could not do what most of them do, nor could most of them do what I do.  Very few of them could be considered my friends, and most of them would probably never want to associate with me anyway.  Nevertheless, we need each other:  every warrior, every clerk, every mechanic, every technician, every lawyer, every cook, every aviator, every logistician, every sanitation worker.  If we do not find a way to cooperate, then this living, breathing organism we call the National Defense Establishment will fail, and with its failure the United States of America fails.

Is this any different from the living, breathing organism known as the Body of Messiah?

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Foundations of Ephraimite National Identity

Bney Yosef National Congress BannerThe first day of the Bney Yosef (Sons of Joseph) National Congress has concluded with great promise.  The delegates gathered at Ariel, Israel, among the hills of Samaria, are united in the understanding that the time has come at last for the Lord God to fulfill His promises to restore all of Israel in preparation for Messiah’s coming to establish His throne in Jerusalem.

It was my honor and privilege to present the first address to the Congress.  This presentation on Israelite identity met with a positive reception from the assembly.  I share it here as a glimpse into the matters we are deliberating.


Foundations of Northern Israelite (Ephraimite) National Identity

Albert Jackson McCarn

presented at the First Bney Yosef National Congress

Ariel, Israel

May 26, 2015

By this time I hope that all of us have had our first “moment” here in the Land. You who have enjoyed such an experience know what I mean: it is that instant when you know you are home at last. On Shavuot I had the honor of being present when such a moment came upon one of our brethren at the Kotel (Western Wall) in Jerusalem. Another brother shared his moment at the Har Bracha (Mount Gerizim, the Mount of Blessing; Deuteronomy 11:29, 27:12-13; Joshua 8:33) yesterday. My moment came last week at Caesarea. Allow me to share it with you.

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The Barking Fox on Hebrew Nation Radio

BFB150206 The Hebrew Nation Morning ShowIt is always interesting to see how the Ruach haKodesh (Holy Spirit) makes connections to achieve the Father’s purposes.  Soon after The Barking Fox announced publication of our new book, Give Me A Place Where I May Dwell, Gene Porter of Hebrew Nation Radio asked if he could interview me on the Thursday morning broadcast he co-hosts with Bonnie Harvey.  It just so happened that they had an opening on February 5, and so I had the great pleasure and honor of talking with them for an hour.  During the second hour of the broadcast, Gene, Bonnie, and Don Wyant, co-founder of Hebrew Nation Radio, launched into a round-table discussion on the subject of the Whole House of Israel.  Their discussion provides an excellent ground-level introduction to the subject for those who are unfamiliar with this rapidly accelerating move of the Lord (see Jeremiah 16:14-21).  To hear the entire broadcast of The Hebrew Nation Morning Show, please click here:

Author of Brand New Two House Book Guests on Hebrew Nation Radio Thursday Morning Show

Give Me A Place Where I May Dwell is now available in paperback and in Kindle versions at the following links:

To purchase copies in print, please click here.

To purchase the Kindle version, please click here.


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2015.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Barking Fox Wrote A Book!

Give Me A Place Where I May Dwell is a meticulously researched book that makes a compelling biblical and contemporary case for building a global consciousness among Hebrew Roots believers—and eventually finding a homeland for these Ephraimites in Israel.
Give Me A Place Where I May Dwell is a meticulously researched book that makes a compelling biblical and contemporary case for Hebrew Roots believers building a national consciousness as a people within the Commonwealth of Israel.

What was the last question Yeshua’s followers asked Him before He returned to the Father?  According to Acts 1:6, they asked, “Lord, will You at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?”

Why would they ask that?  Because restoration of the kingdom of Israel is the single greatest promise and prophecy in the entire Bible!  From Moses John the Apostle, every prophet and nearly every book contain references to God’s promise to regather and restore all of Israel, the House of Ephraim and the House of Judah, to the Land promised to our fathers Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.  That is the national mission Messiah Yeshua Himself proclaimed:

But He answered and said, “I was not sent except to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”  (Matthew 15:24 NASB)

When the apostles asked Yeshua about restoring the kingdom, He did not rebuke them or deny that the restoration would happen.  Rather, He said that they were not the ones who would know when it would happen.  Instead, they were to receive the power of the Holy Spirit to proclaim the message of Messiah and His kingdom to the entire world (Acts 1:7-8).

Over the last 2,000 years, that message has become muddled.  Followers of Yeshua have rightly proclaimed the salvation available through His work of redemption, but have missed the next crucial point:  that identification with Messiah Yeshua means citizenship in His dominion, which is called Israel.

So what does it mean to become part of Israel?  And when and how will the Son of David restore this united kingdom which has not existed for nearly three millennia?  That is the topic of Give Me A Place Where I May Dwell:  An Ephraimite Affirmation.  This is the first book published by Al McCarn, your host at The Barking Fox.  Here is what Amazon.com has to say about it:

Why should contemporary Christians take an interest in the State of Israel?  For Hebrew Roots believers, or Torah-observant Christians, the fascination goes beyond the ongoing Middle East conflict or speculation about the second coming of Messiah.  Hebrew Roots believers embrace the Commandments of Moses, as exemplified by Messiah Yeshua’s (Jesus Christ’s) adherence to Torah.  For these dedicated believers, Israel represents God’s ultimate promise:  the reunification of the ancient kingdom and a true homeland for all believers.

Give Me a Place Where I May Dwell is a meticulously researched account of the global Hebrew Roots movement among Christians.  Author Albert J. McCarn examines the beliefs and goals of non-Jewish Israelites in a biblical, historical, and contemporary context.

He refers to believers as Ephraimites, or the remnants of the exiled northern kingdom of Israel.  Since Ephraimites are spread throughout the world, McCarn presents a compelling case for building a collective identity among all Torah-observant followers of Yeshua—with the goal of an eventual homeland in the Holy Land.

Through McCarn’s hopeful message, Give Me a Place Where I May Dwell makes a compelling and scholarly theological case for uniting all followers of the great awakening that is the Hebrew Roots movement.

Give Me A Place Where I May Dwell is now available in paperback at CreateSpace.com, an Amazon company, and will soon be available on Kindle.  To order copies, please click here.


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2015.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Evolution Of Words: What Is A Gentile?

Noah Webster Portrait by Samuel F.B. Morse
Noah Webster
Portrait by Samuel F.B. Morse

This week The Barking Fox celebrates one year since entering the blogosphere.  It is exciting to see how many places this blog has reached thanks to the miracles of modern technology, but it is even more exciting to consider the many people I have encountered through the blog and related activities.  One of those people is Ken Rank of United 2 Restore.  I first heard of Ken last spring through the video he made with Hanoch Young on the reunification of Judah and Ephraim.  Since then I have enjoyed reading his posts on Facebook and elsewhere, and have appreciated the work he and Hanoch are doing to raise awareness of the connection Jews and Christians share as Israelites.  In fact, that connection is at the root of the theme for The Barking Fox in 2015.  In this coming year, the Fox will ask the same question the Apostles asked Yeshua during their last conversation with Him:  “Lord, is it at this time You are restoring the kingdom to Israel?” (Acts 1:6)  The answer we seem to be hearing these days is that the restoration depends on where we pin our identity.  And that is exactly what Ken addresses in this short article.

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