Just Stewards

BFB211030 Heerschop - Rebecca and Abrahams Servant
Rebecca Receiving Presents from Abraham’s Servant, Hendrick Heerschop, 1656, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.  

Our Creator has a reason for calling on people to deny themselves and serve others. It’s more than just being polite. He would like us to cultivate character traits of humility and service as part of our very nature. That way we enter eternity equipped to overcome any temptation to try to take His place. Apparently there was a problem with that in an earlier version of the Cosmos.

Genesis 23:1-25:18; 1 Kings 1:1-31; Psalm 84; Luke 16:10-13

Click here to listen to the podcast: Just Stewards

Click here to download the transcript: Just Stewards.pdf

Music: “The Faithful One,” Chris Eaton, Selah, Bless the Broken Road: The Duets Album, Curb 2006.

Weekly Bible Reading for October 24-30: Chayei Sarah (Life of Sarah)

This coming week, October 24-30 (18-24 Cheshvan 5782), the Bible reading plan covers the portion Chayei Sarah (Life of Sarah).

24 Oct Genesis 23:1-16 Judges 7:9-8:27 Matthew 13:36-58 Proverbs 3:19-26
25 Oct Genesis 23:17-24:9 Judges 8:28-9:41 Matthew 14:1-21 Proverbs 3:27-35
26 Oct Genesis 24:10-26 Judges 9:42-10:18 Matthew 14:22-36 Psalm 16:1-11
27 Oct Genesis 24:27-52 Judges 11:1-40 Matthew 15:1-20 Psalm 17:1-15
28 Oct Genesis 24:53-67 Judges 12:1-13:25 Matthew 15:21-39 Psalm 18:1-12
29 Oct Genesis 25:1-11 Judges 14:1-15:20 Matthew 16:1-20 Psalm 18:13-24
30 Oct Genesis 25:12-18 1 Kings 1:1-31 Matthew 16:21-17:13 Psalm 18:25-36

The complete annual Bible reading plan for 2021-22 (Hebrew year 5782) is available at this link:

Weekly Bible Reading for November 8-14 2020: Chayei Sarah (Life of Sarah)

This coming week, November 8-14 (21-27 Cheshvan), the Bible reading plan covers the following portions.

Chayei Sarah (Life of Sarah)

08 Nov Genesis 23:1-16 Judges 14:1-15:20 Matthew 18:1-20 Psalm 18:20-31
09 Nov Genesis 23:17-24:9 Judges 16:1-17:13 Matthew 18:21-35 Psalm 18:32-50
01 Nov Genesis 24:10-26 Judges 18:1-31 Matthew 19:1-15 Psalm 19:1-14
11 Nov Genesis 24:27-52 Judges 19:1-30 Matthew 19:16-30 Psalm 20:1-9
12 Nov Genesis 24:53-67 Judges 20:1-48 Matthew 20:1-16 Proverbs 4:1-9
13 Nov Genesis 25:1-11 Judges 21:1-25 Matthew 20:17-34 Proverbs 4:10-19
14 Nov Genesis 25:12-18 1 Kings 1:1-31 Matthew 21:1-22 Proverbs 4:20-27

The complete annual Bible reading plan for 2020-21 (Hebrew year 5781) is available at this link:

Fox Byte 5775 #5: Chayei Sarah (Life of Sarah)

חַיֵּי שָׂרָה

By remaining faithful to the true king, Faramir son of Denethor completed the centuries-long task of the Stewards of Gondor.  The king rewarded him with the title Prince of Ithilien.  (David Wenham as Faramir in the 2002 New Line Cinema production of The Lord of The Rings:  The Two Towers.  Accessed on lotr.wikia.com)
By remaining faithful to the true king, Faramir son of Denethor completed the centuries-long task of the Stewards of Gondor. The king rewarded him with the title Prince of Ithilien. (David Wenham as Faramir in the 2002 New Line Cinema production of The Lord of The Rings: The Two Towers. Accessed on lotr.wikia.com)

J.R.R. Tolkien’s works had secured for him a lasting place among the giants of English literature long before Peter Jackson ever brought The Lord of the Rings to the big screen.  Middle Earth, with its Elves, Men, Dwarves, Hobbits, Orcs, and Wizards, serves as the backdrop for a profound tale about our humanness – what it means, and what we would like it to mean.  We would like to see ourselves, for example, as high and noble, like the Elves or the Men of Gondor.  Tolkien expresses this nobility in many subplots, not the least being the saga of the Stewards of Gondor.  We learn about them from Faramir, son of Denethor, the current Steward:

We of my house are not of the line of [King] Elendil, though the blood of Númenor is in us.  For we reckon back our line to Mardil, the good steward, who ruled in the king’s stead when he went away to war.  And that was King Eärnur, last of the line of Anárion, and childless, and he came never back.  And the stewards have governed the city since that day, though it was many generations of Men ago.  (The Two Towers, Book IV, “The Window On the West”)

Faramir relates how his older brother, Boromir, could not understand why his father had not claimed the throne.  He had asked, “How many hundreds of years needs it to make a steward a king, if the king returns not?”  To this his father replied, “Few years, maybe, in other places of less royalty . . . In Gondor ten thousand years would not suffice.”

It is here that we must question Tolkien’s grasp on reality.  He describes a degree of nobility and selfless honor that transcends generations.  It is remarkable for one person to lay aside his or her own interests to guard a place of higher power, wealth, and prestige for someone else.  How could such selflessness be passed down from one generation to the next, knowing that at some point the supreme authority would have to be handed over to someone else?

And yet that is exactly what our God expects His people to do.

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