A Born Again Creation

Der Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer (The Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog), Caspar David Friedrich, c 1817, Kunsthalle Hamburg via Wikimedia Commons.

Transcending our present imperfect reality is a universal longing. The Bible tells us about that transcendence in the context of new birth and resurrection. It is the work of God, but do the people of God have some work to do as well?

Genesis 1:26-27, 2:7, 5:1-3; Isaiah 42:1-9, John 3:1-6; Luke 4:14-21, 7:20-23; Romans 8:18-23

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Music: Tod und Verklärung, Op. 24, performed by Herbert Von Karajan and the Wiener Philharmoniker, Herbert Von Karajan Conducts, Ameritz Music Ltd. 2014.

Fox Byte 5775 #6: Toldot (Generations)

תּוֹלְדֹת

Lenard Nimoy portrayed a famous Evil Twin in his dual role as Mr. Spock and his alter-ego in "Mirror Mirror", one of the most memorable episodes of Star Trek, The Original Series.
A recent presentation of the Evil Twin motif occurred in “Mirror Mirror”, one of the most memorable episodes of Star Trek, The Original Series.  In that episode, Leonard Nimoy portrayed both Mr. Spock and his evil alter-ego.

Who invented the concept of the “Evil Twin”?  This is not just a literary device.  It is a byword, a running gag, a recurring theme in everyday life.  When someone does something ridiculous, for example, they say, “That wasn’t me; it was my evil twin.”  The motif of the twin, or double, stepping into the role of someone else provides endless possibilities for comedy or tragedy based on mistaken identity.  But where did this idea get started?  Perhaps, like so many other things, the answer is in the Bible:

And not only this, but there was Rebekah also, when she had conceived twins by one man, our father Isaac; for though the twins were not yet born and had not done anything good or bad, so that God’s purpose according to His choice would stand, not because of works but because of Him who calls, it was said to her, “The older will serve the younger.”  Just as it is written, “Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated.”  (Romans 9:10-13 NASB)

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Fox Byte 5775 #5: Chayei Sarah (Life of Sarah)

חַיֵּי שָׂרָה

By remaining faithful to the true king, Faramir son of Denethor completed the centuries-long task of the Stewards of Gondor.  The king rewarded him with the title Prince of Ithilien.  (David Wenham as Faramir in the 2002 New Line Cinema production of The Lord of The Rings:  The Two Towers.  Accessed on lotr.wikia.com)
By remaining faithful to the true king, Faramir son of Denethor completed the centuries-long task of the Stewards of Gondor. The king rewarded him with the title Prince of Ithilien. (David Wenham as Faramir in the 2002 New Line Cinema production of The Lord of The Rings: The Two Towers. Accessed on lotr.wikia.com)

J.R.R. Tolkien’s works had secured for him a lasting place among the giants of English literature long before Peter Jackson ever brought The Lord of the Rings to the big screen.  Middle Earth, with its Elves, Men, Dwarves, Hobbits, Orcs, and Wizards, serves as the backdrop for a profound tale about our humanness – what it means, and what we would like it to mean.  We would like to see ourselves, for example, as high and noble, like the Elves or the Men of Gondor.  Tolkien expresses this nobility in many subplots, not the least being the saga of the Stewards of Gondor.  We learn about them from Faramir, son of Denethor, the current Steward:

We of my house are not of the line of [King] Elendil, though the blood of Númenor is in us.  For we reckon back our line to Mardil, the good steward, who ruled in the king’s stead when he went away to war.  And that was King Eärnur, last of the line of Anárion, and childless, and he came never back.  And the stewards have governed the city since that day, though it was many generations of Men ago.  (The Two Towers, Book IV, “The Window On the West”)

Faramir relates how his older brother, Boromir, could not understand why his father had not claimed the throne.  He had asked, “How many hundreds of years needs it to make a steward a king, if the king returns not?”  To this his father replied, “Few years, maybe, in other places of less royalty . . . In Gondor ten thousand years would not suffice.”

It is here that we must question Tolkien’s grasp on reality.  He describes a degree of nobility and selfless honor that transcends generations.  It is remarkable for one person to lay aside his or her own interests to guard a place of higher power, wealth, and prestige for someone else.  How could such selflessness be passed down from one generation to the next, knowing that at some point the supreme authority would have to be handed over to someone else?

And yet that is exactly what our God expects His people to do.

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