Tag Archive | Ben Hur

Fox Byte 5775 #50: Ki Tavo (When You Enter In)

כִּי־תָבִוֹא

Quintus Arrius (Jack Hawkens) offers water to Judah Ben Hur (Charlton Heston) in the 1959 epic, Ben Hur. (Photo: Warner Home Video, featured in "A Day at the Chariot Races: The Digital Liberation of ‘Ben-Hur’", by Bill Desowitz, Motion Picture Editors Guild, November 21, 2011)

Quintus Arrius (Jack Hawkins) offers water to Judah Ben Hur (Charlton Heston) in the 1959 epic, Ben Hur. (Photo: Warner Home Video, featured in “A Day at the Chariot Races: The Digital Liberation of ‘Ben-Hur’”, by Bill Desowitz, Motion Picture Editors Guild, November 21, 2011)

When General Lew Wallace published Ben Hur in 1880, he had no idea that his tale of a wrongfully condemned Jewish prince would have such an impact on modern audiences.  It is a tale of redemption, being the product of Wallace’s own investigation into the validity of the Christian faith.  The epic scale of the story lends itself to the big screen, but Hollywood’s first effort at bringing Wallace’s characters to life in 1925 fell short of the mark.  It took another generation of filmmakers, capitalizing on improved technology and cinematic techniques, to do justice to the tale.  The result was William Wyler’s 1959 production of Ben Hur, a film that surpassed the achievements of Cecil B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments, released just three years previously.  Wyler and DeMille both worked with the same leading man:  Charlton Heston, a handsome actor known for his portrayals of tough men of action.  Heston’s depiction of Moses remains the standard for cinematic portrayals of Israel’s Lawgiver, but it was his role as Judah Ben Hur which won him an Oscar as Best Actor.

The story follows Judah in his quest for revenge after his family is unjustly accused and sentenced for allegedly attempting to kill the new Roman governor of Judea.  His mother and sister are taken to prison, but Judah is condemned to a hellish existence rowing the galleys of Rome’s navy.  After three years his ship receives a new commander, Consul Quintus Arrius (played by Jack Hawkins), who leads the fleet against pirates who have menaced the sea lanes.  On inspecting the rowers, Arrius takes notice of Judah as a man full of hate, but able to control it, a trait the Consul finds useful.  Upon concluding his inspection Arrius offers this advice:

Now listen to me, all of you.  You are all condemned men.  We keep you alive to serve this ship.  So row well, and live.

Judah finds opportunity to do more than that.  In battle his ship is rammed and sinks, but he is able to escape and save the life of Consul Arrius.  Later they learn the Roman fleet has won the day and Arrius is a hero.  He returns to Rome, bringing Judah with him in hope of repaying the debt of his life.  Judah becomes a famous chariot racer, trusted with some of his master’s most prized possessions.  In time, Arrius rewards Judah with the greatest gift he can bestow:  adoption as his son and heir. 

Eventually Judah returns home, finds his mother and sister, and avenges the wrong done to his house.  Yet it is not until he encounters Yeshua (Jesus) of Nazareth that he finds true peace.  Lew Wallace’s story is, after all, a tale of the Christ, and would be incomplete without the redemption the Messiah offers.  The roots of the story, however, go back to the time of Moses, when he spoke these words to the people of Israel:

The Lord has today declared you to be His people, a treasured possession, as He promised you, and that you should keep all His commandments; and that He will set you high above all nations which He has made, for praise, fame, and honor; and that you shall be a consecrated people to the Lord your God, as He has spoken.  (Deuteronomy 26:18-19 NASB)

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Missed the Crucifixion? Don’t Miss the Resurrection!

BFB140417 ResurrectionThis is Good Friday according to Christian tradition, but it’s not the day Yeshua (Jesus) was crucified as the Lamb of God Who takes away the sins of the world (John 1:29).  The Scripture record explains that Yeshua’s execution took place in the middle of the week, on the day we call Wednesday.  Thus He was in the grave the full three days and three nights as prophesied (Matthew 12:40), returning to life on the day we call Sunday, the first day of the week (Matthew 28:1-8; Mark 16:1-11; Luke 24:1-7; John 20:1-18).

We live in a very exciting time.  Right before our eyes, God is restoring to His people the whole counsel of His Word.  That is why we can see Yeshua in the appointed times of God which have been preserved by Jews over the centuries.  I cannot emphasize enough these words of the Apostle Paul:

What advantage then has the Jew, or what is the profit of circumcision?  Much in every way!  Chiefly because to them were committed the oracles of God.  (Romans 3:1-2 NKJV)

We Christians do ourselves and our Jewish brethren a great disservice by continuing to divorce our faith from its roots as planted deeply by our Lord in the hearts of our common fathers Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.  Therefore let us learn from one another that we may be complete in Yeshua, the One New Man established by His death, burial, resurrection, and eternal example.

Here are some tools made available through fellow Hebrew Roots bloggers that help with our understanding of this truth.  The first is a graphic provided by the brethren at Faith, Grace & Torah:

BFB140417 Passover Week

Download high quality 8.5×11 PDF of this timeline here.

Download high quality 11×17 PDF of this timeline here.

The second offering was posted recently on Pete Rambo’s blog natsab (Here I Stand).  This 50-minute movie not only presents Passover in a first-century Jewish context, but puts Yeshua right there in the middle of it.  If you ever had any doubts about Yeshua’s Jewishness, or His fulfillment of the prophesied redemption as Messiah, carve out a little time this weekend and take a look at this production by Kingdom Entertainment – maybe even sandwich it between your annual screening of The Ten Commandments and Ben Hur.


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2014.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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