The Nexus of Torah, Messiah, and Israel

In this inaugural show of our new format, Mike Clayton and Al McCarn talk about the scriptural basis for the return of the House of Israel/Ephraim, and why so many Christians are awakening to an understanding of this and of their part in it. If Israel really is our home, then what happens there now should be of interest to us, and we should prayerfully consider how to get involved in support of the State of Israel and the Jewish people.

Our second hour features a lively conversation with Jeremy Chance Springfield, a lifelong student of Biblical Hebrew. His studies have resulted in fascinating and thought-provoking teachings now available on his web site, Random Groovy Bible Facts. He shares with us some of his insights, such as why the Torah requires Messiah to be born of a virgin. That’s just one of many eye-opening perspectives Jeremy brings about the foundation in Torah of many important points we have believed by faith, but may not know how to explain from Scripture.

To listen, click here:

http://hebrewnationonline.com/hebrew-nation-morning-show-the-remnant-road-8717/

The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn, Mike Clayton, and Barry Phillips is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.

© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

What is Tisha B’Av, and why should you care?

One of those mysterious verses for those who did not grow up Jewish is this one from Zechariah:

Thus says the Lord of hosts, “The fast of the fourth, the fast of the fifth, the fast of the seventh and the fast of the tenth months will become joy, gladness, and cheerful feasts for the house of Judah; so love truth and peace.” (Zechariah 8:19 NASB)

We know from Torah that the fast of the seventh month is Yom Kippur, but what are the others? In this show, we talk about two of them: the 17th of Tammuz (Fast of the Fourth Month), and the 9th of Av (Fast of the Fifth Month). Those dates mark the three-week period known as the Dire Straits, when disastrous things have happened to the Jewish people and the entire nation of Israel throughout history. Such things include the sin of the Golden Calf at Mount Sinai, the destruction of both Temples, the onset of the Holocaust, the expulsion of Jews from many nations, and more. (The Fast of the Tenth Month is Asara B’Tevet, which commemorates the beginning of the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar.)

Something very significant has happened during the Dire Straits this year: the Temple Mount has become the center of a controversy that threatens the security of Israel and the status quo in the Middle East. That’s why we asked three men who know the situation well to share their thoughts about it.

  • Mikell Clayton of Joined to Hashem is filling in for Al as Daniel’s co-host on this show. He is intimately acquainted with the Land and people of Israel, thanks to his many years of travel there and his extensive contacts in the Land.
  • Hanoch Young of Kol Yehuda brings his perspective as an Israeli and as a Jewish voice who has labored for nearly a quarter century in awakening the people of Ephraim to their identity.
  • Barry Phillips of House of David Beit Midrash in Gloucester, VA and of B’ney Yosef North America has labored for many years to reach the remnant of Israel and see it restored.

In this very special program, you will hear the passion of these brothers in seeing all of Israel restored as God has promised throughout His word. Here also we say farewell to Daniel, who is leaving the show as the Lord leads him to a new assignment.

To listen, click here:

http://hebrewnationonline.com/hebrew-nation-morning-show-the-remnant-road-73117/

The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn and Daniel Holdings, is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.

© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Where YHVH Placed His Name

Here’s what is coming up on The Remnant Road on Hebrew Nation Radio for Monday, April 17:

We are just weeks away from the 50th anniversary of Israel regaining control of the Temple Mount. In recent years, preparations for rebuilding the Temple and reestablishing the Aaronic priesthood have progressed significantly, even to the point of having trained priests conduct reenactments of the Passover sacrifice, and blessing worshippers at the Western Wall.

It just so happens that one of the foremost authorities on the Temple is not Israeli; he’s a Texan! Joseph Good of Hatikvah Ministries and Jerusalem Temple Study is no stranger to Hebrew Nation Radio. He shares his decades of learning each Sunday on Measure the Pattern. We are honored to have Joe join us on the Remnant Road.

Are you curious about the actual location of the Temple? Do you wonder how the new generation of priests know what to do? Have you thought about whether non-Jews might have access to the Third Temple, or why this might be important? Listen as we ask Joe these and many other questions!

The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn and Daniel Holdings, is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.

© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Fox Byte 5775 #25: Tzav (Command)

צַו

Operating in deadly environments. Clockwise from top: James Franciscus, Gene Hackman, and Richard Crenna in the 1969 space drama Marooned (photo: Movie Hunger); Peter Coyote, Samuel L. Jackson, and Dustin Hoffman under the sea in Sphere (photo: Torrent Garden); Gregory Peck sends John Meillon ashore in the radiation charged atmosphere of San Diego in the film adaptation of On the Beach (photo: Senses of Cinema); Dustin Hoffman in a virus-infected hot zone in Outbreak (photo: ET Online).
Operating in deadly environments. Clockwise from top: James Franciscus, Gene Hackman, and Richard Crenna in the 1969 space drama Marooned (photo: Movie Hunger); Peter Coyote, Samuel L. Jackson, and Dustin Hoffman under the sea in Sphere (photo: Torrent Garden); Gregory Peck sends John Meillon ashore in the radiation charged atmosphere of San Diego in the film adaptation of On the Beach (photo: Senses of Cinema); Dustin Hoffman in a virus-infected hot zone in Outbreak (photo: ET Online).

Consider the fragility of human existence.  We survive within a specific set of environmental parameters – a fixed range of temperature, hydration, radiation, and atmospheric content.  From a cosmic perspective the margin of error is very small; the slightest adjustment in even a single factor, such as the amount of oxygen, quickly moves the environment from pleasant to deadly.  Yet we have learned how to venture into the realm of the deadly when necessary.  Thanks to protective clothing, equipment, and protocols, our species can operate within the vacuum of space, in the ocean’s depths, in the radiation-charged atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, and in the hot zone of an infectious disease laboratory.

We venture into these deadly environments, but we do not live there.  We cannot survive there without observing the strictest standards.  Those who enter these realms understand this.  Astronauts, deep sea explorers, nuclear engineers, and epidemiologists are professionals who have answered the call to highly specialized career fields.  Not all who enter the paths of these professions advance to the point that they can operate confidently in the most dangerous places.  The selection and training standards must be established at the highest possible levels for the simple reason that the slightest error can produce lethal results.  Richard Preston explained this principle in The Hot Zone, an investigative look into the origins of viral hemorrhagic fevers like Ebola.  We learn from his book that the protocols for entering, working in, and leaving an infectious disease lab are elaborate and time-consuming, but necessary.  No amount of caution is excessive when microscopic killers can infiltrate through the tiniest puncture of a protective suit or escape through an improper seal of an airlock.  The viruses create the hot zone, whether it is in the lab or in the human body.  Because of the radical transformative nature of these microorganisms, the highly trained professionals who work with viruses like Ebola in a very real sense act as mediators between them and the general population.

In fact, the role of these professionals is not unlike the role of the Levitical priests.

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Fox Byte 5775 #24: Vayikra (He called)

וַיִּקְרָא

In this scene from The Cat in the Hat, the son takes action to stop the desecration of the house.  (Picture from The Cat in the Hat, read by RC Ward, on Just Books Read Aloud)
In this scene from The Cat in the Hat, the son takes action to stop the desecration of the house. (Picture from The Cat in the Hat, read by RC Ward, on Just Books Read Aloud)

A standard feature of civilization is the rules of the house, the guidelines by which a person can be welcomed into and remain peacefully within someone’s home.  At the most basic level these are rules children learn from their parents at the earliest age.  Parents explain proper behavior and children grow up doing what they have said, or suffering the consequences if they disobey.  As adults the children pass on these rules to their children so they may act properly when visiting Grandma and Grandpa.  This maintains peace in the family, not only ensuring respect for the elders, but establishing and reinforcing a foundation for loving relationships.

If this is so, then how should we approach The Cat in the Hat?  Since its publication in 1957 by Theodore Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss), The Cat in the Hat has become one of the world’s most popular and successful children’s books.  Geisel wrote it as an attempt to find an easier way for children to learn to read, but his creation has become much more than that; the Cat is now a cultural icon.  The book has everything that would appeal to children:  an engaging story told in simple, silly rhyme, colorful illustrations, and an outrageous degree of irreverence for the house rules.  The story opens with a rainy day in a normal house, where a Boy and his sister Sally are left at home with nothing to do while their Mother is out.  Suddenly their quiet boredom is interrupted by the entrance of the Cat who promises, “Lots of good fun that is funny”.  He then proceeds to violate every rule of the house by using everything he sees – including the pet Fish in its bowl – as a plaything.  Just when we think it can get no worse, the Cat introduces his friends Thing 1 and Thing 2.  The three anarchic intruders accelerate the mayhem, and in a very short time everything that is sacred, including Mother’s new gown and her bedroom furniture, have suffered violence.  At the height of the disaster, the Fish alerts the children to the approach of their Mother and urges them to do something to stop the destruction.  The Boy jumps into action, grabbing a large net with which he captures the Things and orders the Cat to pack them up and take them away.

With the intruders gone, the children and the Fish contemplate how to clean up the enormous mess.  To their surprise, the Cat returns with a machine that puts everything back in order just in time.  Thus The Cat in the Hat ends on a good note, with the house rules mended.  Yet that is not the end of the lesson.  While Dr. Seuss may not have intended it, his story resembles the tale of another Son concerned about violation of the house rules established by His Parent:

And Jesus entered the temple and drove out all those who were buying and selling in the temple, and overturned the tables of the money changers and the seats of those who were selling doves.  And He said to them, “It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer’; but you are making it a robbers’ den.”  (Matthew 21:12-13 NASB)

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