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When the Bible Comes Alive

Here’s what’s coming on Hebrew Nation Radio on Monday, November 20:

The Bible is a history book. The events recorded in it really happened to real, flesh-and-blood people who were not very different from real people who have lived in every age and in every place. Maybe if we understand that a little better, we would read the Bible with more interest.

Miriam Feinberg Vamosh can help us with that. This American-born Israeli writer, translator, and guide has a deep love of her homeland. She has learned much about her Jewish heritage in the Land, and about the course of Israel’s history which have shaped the realities of the present. She is eager to share her learning with others. As she says

My love affair with the Bible and ancient sources, which led to my books and articles, deepened over my many years as a tour educator – and thus, every visitor who ever asked me a question has earned my gratitude.

Miriam’s decades of work have resulted in a number of books which introduce audiences to a wide variety of aspects about the land and people of Israel. This includes her first historical fiction novel, The Scroll. Miriam crafted this story from a real archaeological find from Masada, weaving it into the saga of a family that spans the dramatic decades from the fall of Masada at the end of the Great Jewish War to the Bar Kokhba Revolt in 135 CE.

Come along and join us in our visit with Miriam. You just might learn that life in modern Israel is just as fascinating as Israel’s bigger-than-life biblical history!

Check out Miriam’s web site at http://miriamfeinbergvamosh.com/.

The Remnant Road, with co-hosts Al McCarn, Mike Clayton, Barry Phillips, and Hanoch Young is the Monday edition of the Hebrew Nation Morning Show.  You can listen live at 11:00–1:00 EST, 8:00-10:00 PST at http://hebrewnationonline.com/, and on podcast at any time.

© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2017.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Kickstarter update #2

Key points here:
– This is an opportunity to reach MILLIONS.
– Pray, and help get the word out.
– Give as you are able (surely more than 16 people are able!!!)

Click here to learn how you can help.

natsab

Two weeks to go and we are not yet half way there…  While the Father has this in His hands, we are called to action.  Before us is an opportunity to share broadly what we are understanding concerning the Hebrew roots of our faith and the everlasting nature of the Torah!!  We can rise to the occasion and help bring this message through a mainstream outlet that gets 6 MILLION hits a day, or we can let this opportunity go by the boards….

Currently, we do not yet have half of the funding pledged, while half of the time has passed.  Let us not let this opportunity slip by!  Here’s what you can do:

  • Help get the word out.  Share with your social media connections!
  • Pray for the Father’s favor.
  • Give as you are able.  (I have to believe more than 16 people are able…)

To learn more, go here

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Redefining the Last Act: A Review of The Revelation of Jesus Christ Revealed, by Christine Miller

If most of the events prophesied in the book of Revelation had already taken place, would we live our lives differently?  That is the question at the back of the reader’s mind while processing the wealth of data presented by Christine Miller in her book, The Revelation of Jesus Christ Revealed.

Another question one might ask is why the world needs yet another book on prophecy.  The answer, like the book, is logical and straightforward:  we need an understanding of how the symbols in Revelation correspond to real events and people in the history of the world since the Apostle John wrote Revelation in the year 96 CE.  In other words, Miller cuts through the hyper-sensationalized end-of-the-world drama to examine what Revelation really means in a way that readers not only can understand, but can use as a starting point for their own study.

Miller’s premise is that Revelation constitutes the history of the world as it unfolds between the first and second comings of Jesus Christ (Yeshua the Messiah).  She bases this premise on the precedent set elsewhere in Scripture, particularly in the book of Daniel, which presents the prophetic history of the world from the end of the Babylonian exile of the Jewish people to the first coming of Messiah.  In a lengthy appendix Miller relates the well-known histories of the wars over the Holy Land between the Seleucid (Greco-Syrian) and Ptolemaic (Greco-Egyptian) kingdoms in the centuries following the death of Alexander the Great.  Those wars produced the Abomination of Desolation, in which the Seleucid king Antiochus IV desecrated the Temple in Jerusalem and banned the Jews from every aspect of worship of YHVH.  As the Jews responded in the War of the Maccabees, YHVH intervened on their behalf to bring the victory memorialized in the festival of Hanukkah.  Yet Miller does not stop there; she continues her analysis of Daniel’s prophecies all the way through the ministry of Yeshua and his apostles, making a convincing argument about how they fulfilled the cryptic statement in Daniel 9:27 –

And he shall confirm a covenant with many for one week, and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the offering to cease; and on the wing of abominations shall be one which makes desolate; and even to that full end, which is determined, is poured out on that which makes desolate.

What Miller does with Daniel in an appendix of her book is a microcosm of what she does with Revelation in the body of the work.  She begins with this explanation:

The view that all the events of Revelation are future to us is a relatively new view in the history of the church.  Traditionally, Revelation was seen as an unfolding prophecy of the things which will take place between the first and second comings of Jesus Christ.  This unfolding historical prophecy is in the same manner as Daniel, which set the precedent.

With that introduction, she takes us on a whirlwind tour of two millennia of Roman history.

Please click here to continue reading

Checking Out to Check In: A Review of The Hope Merchant, by Adam Eliyahu Berkowitz

bfb161227-the-hope-merchantSocial commentary is perilous.  Since those who engage in it usually have an axe to grind, they too easily succumb to bitterly cynical sarcasm, or pitifully ridiculous absurdity.  On occasion an angry social critic will get it right and inspire generations with profound observations of civilization’s problems – regardless whether his or her prescriptions for fixing those problems have any chance of working out as intended.  But for the most part, this kind of social commentary serves only to make people more angry without really addressing the root problem.

The key to successful social commentary is to turn it into fiction.  That way the cynicism, ridicule, and anger get channeled into something constructive and lasting.  If done properly, the targets of the most bitter epithets will be laughing or crying so hard that they will never know they have been lampooned.  That is why such classics as Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Voltaire’s Candide, and Vonnegut’s Sirens of Titan remain with us today.

Adam Berkowitz has made a great start at entering such august company thanks to his first novel, The Hope Merchant.  Usually a novel introduces the protagonist in the first few pages and follows him or her closely to the end.  Berkowitz does that, but in a delightfully twisted way.  The Hope Merchant is Theo S. Meyer, someone we would not expect at first to be the center of attention in a literary work.  He is the awkward young teenager on his parents’ dairy farm; the one no one notices, but who seems to come up with just the right word at the right time to address something painful – even a pain that reaches far down into the soul.

The reason we take no immediate notice of Theo is because our focus is on one of his first customers:  an over-aggressive young corporate attorney named Jack.  An odd series of events brings Jack to sojourn on the Meyer farm, and there he is transformed by Theo’s magic.  Well, perhaps we could call it magic.  We never really know how Theo and Big Brad, the Inuit farm hand who trained him in the ways of native medicine, bend events to create precisely the situations required to help people help themselves, but that is the pattern throughout the book.

Please click here to continue reading

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