Fox Byte 5775: Pesach (Passover)

פֶּסַח

Tolkien in 1972, in his study at Merton Street (from J. R. R. Tolkien. A Biography by H. Carpenter; accessed on lotr.wikia.com)
Tolkien in 1972, in his study at Merton Street (from J. R. R. Tolkien. A Biography by H. Carpenter; accessed on lotr.wikia.com)

Professor J.R.R. Tolkien insisted that there was no hidden meaning behind his works on Middle Earth.  Such was his assertion in his Foreword to The Lord of the Rings:

I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence.  I much prefer history, true or feigned, with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers.  I think that many confuse ‘applicability’ with ‘allegory’; but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author.

– J.R.R. Tolkien, Foreword to the Second Edition of The Lord of the Rings

Yet there are allegorical elements throughout his writings, however unintended.  Tolkien’s Catholic world view infused his work with well-known Christian concepts such as atonement, salvation, redemption, and fulfillment of prophecy.  A consistent story line appears throughout his writing, repeated on several levels.  It is the story of paradise defiled, of blessed people tempted by evil into betrayal of their calling, of their exile and dissolution, and their restoration at last after the struggles of their exile produce the required degree of contrition and of resolve to live up to their destiny.  In The Silmarillion the tale plays out in the long defeat of the Noldor in their forlorn quest to regain the Silmarils from Morgoth the defiler of Middle Earth.  The cycle ends and begins anew in their redemption beyond all hope by the Valar, the powers over the earth who had exiled the Noldor from the blessed realm of Valinor because of their rebellion.  In The Hobbit it is the restoration of the House of Durin as the Dwarves under the leadership of Thorin Oakenshield set in motion the events that bring the death of the great dragon Smaug and the coronation of a new Dwarf King Under the Mountain.  And in The Lord of the Rings it is the return of Aragorn as King Elessar of Gondor, restoring the long lost (and nearly forgotten) kingdom of the Númenóreans after the defeat of Sauron, Morgoth’s chief lieutenant.

Among the many things we learn from Tolkien is that things happen in cycles.  Life is cyclical, not linear.  What happens to the fathers happens to the sons, and what has come before will come again.  Whether he realized it or not, that is the Hebraic way of looking at the world.  And it is quite biblical.  As Solomon, the son of David, teaches us:

That which has been is that which will be, and that which has been done is that which will be done.  So there is nothing new under the sun.  (Ecclesiastes 1:9 NASB)

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The Godly Legacy of Passover, Part II

This is the second in a two part series on why Christians should celebrate the feasts of Passover, Unleavened Bread, and First Fruits.

"The Chief Priests Ask Jesus by What Right Does He Act in This Way" James Tissot
“The Chief Priests Ask Jesus by What Right Does He Act in This Way”
James Tissot

The Real Passover Timeline

Christian tradition says Jesus was crucified on Good Friday and rose from the grave on Easter Sunday.  However, that is not quite right.  Jesus Himself explained that He had to be three days and three nights in the grave, according to the sign of Jonah which He gave to the scribes and Pharisees in Matthew 12:38-42 and Luke 11:29-32.  Here is how that worked:

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Start Thinking About Passover!

Here’s some seasonal motivation from the Maccabeats performing their Passover version of Les Miserables.  😉


© Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog, 2014.  Permission to use and/or duplicate original material on The Barking Fox Blog is granted, provided that full and clear credit is given to Albert J. McCarn and The Barking Fox Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Godly Legacy of Passover, Part I

This is the first in a two part series on why Christians should celebrate the feasts of Passover, Unleavened Bread, and First Fruits.

"Last Supper" Pascal Dagnan-Bouveret
“Last Supper”
Pascal Dagnan-Bouveret

What is Passover?

Passover this year begins at sundown on Monday, April 14[1] According to Scripture, all of God’s people should be celebrating Passover.  As explained in Leviticus 23, the Passover season consists of three distinct feasts:  Passover (Pesach), Unleavened Bread (Matzot), and First Fruits.  Here is what God said about them: Please click here to continue reading